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This 16-year-old came to us needing medical care after her owner became sick and was unable to care for her. We provided an eye enucleation at our Shelter Medical Center and removed two mammary masses.

Thankfully, the results came back benign, and we were able to adopt her out into a new loving home.

 

Kahlua is an adorable hound mix who recently underwent orthopedic surgery for a femur fracture at our Shelter Medical Center. She is 6-months-old and looking for a foster parent who can assist with spending company as a couch potato or resting in a kennel or small room so she doesn’t use her leg too much.

The best part about becoming a foster parent is that you can adopt if you fall in love! You can also choose the adopter through an application process on our website, or return her to our adoption floor in about 3 weeks. Learn more…

Clover came to IHS severely underweight, depressed, and listless. She was emaciated and sick for several months, vomiting frequently after meals. Our veterinarians examined her and performed diagnostic tests to determine the cause of her illness. Her bloodwork suggested liver disease, but x-rays were taken, and several very large objects were discovered in her intestinal tract which had caused an intestinal blockage.

We performed intestinal surgery to remove the foreign bodies which were difficult to identify due to how long they had been in her body. They likely were the remnants of some type of rubber toy. A liver biopsy was taken and after surgery Learn more…

Sitka was found abandoned in the desert and brought into our shelter for medical care. She was born with an abnormally shaped arm that was catching on items around her and causing her pain. 

We performed surgery and amputated the affected part of her leg that was holding her back in life so she could leave a pain-free and active life! Thanks to our amazing donors, we were able to transfer her back to a smthe small rescue that found her for recovery and adoption!

 

Four-month-old Larry has a new lease on life thanks to a Good Samaritan who found him in need of aid after a traumatic event. West Vet transferred him to our Shelter Medical Center for care. Upon exam, we discovered that he had a degloved chin, where his skin was separated from muscle, exposing the bone and roots of his teeth. Larry’s left front leg had also sustained an irreparable and painful injury, causing him to walk on his elbow for mobility.

We performed surgery to reattach the skin and soft tissues to repair his chin, and amputated the leg that was causing him pain. Unfortunately, we couldn’t repair his leg due to the severity of his injury, and by removing the limb, he could live a more comfortable and pain-free life. Learn more…

She had a faint odor of smoke, singed fur, burned paw pads and ears. Plastic was melted to her thick, matted fur. Her whiskers were also singed, and she wasn’t bearing any weight on her back left leg. All four of her feet had clay litter stuck to them, and her hind feet were inflicted with acute moist dermatitis (hot spots of skin inflammation and bacterial infection).

When Crème was found by a Good Samaritan, they knew she needed our help and rushed her to us. We are unsure what trauma this sweet girl went through, but we are thankful that we could give her a second chance. Learn more…

Tank is just that, a TANK! This friendly boy came to us in early July as a transfer from Burley. When we first examined him, he had wounds open across his back, we believe from a spider bite. We immediately set into action treating him by providing systemic/oral medications and bandage changes. Each bandage change costs approximately $55 and sedation costs $50; we changed bandages under sedation 11 times. That’s nearly $1200 spent on bandage changing alone to provide medical care. Tank has healed very well and there are now only small, superficial wounds remaining that do not need any medications or bandages to finish healing.

This boy is friendly with everyone and everything he has met while here in the shelter! He is reported to do well with cats and dogs in the home (with a proper introduction) and is housetrained. The skin along Tank’s back may be more sensitive to the sun and/or more fragile to abrasions, Learn more…

 

Monte came into the shelter with a severe ear infection in his left ear. Our veterinarians discovered a large polyp growing into his ear canal. Polyps are inflammatory tissue that extends into the ear canal from the middle ear and pharynx. We took x-rays and found that this tissue was filling up the middle ear and causing inflammation in the tympanic bulla- the part of the skull that houses the hearing apparatus and middle ear. With this surgery, Monte’s left ear canal was removed and widened for cleaning and flushing, removing any trace of the polyp.

Monte recovered well. Due to the surgery, he has a slight head tilt to the left as the inner ear determines balance. The head tilt is mild, and it may resolve in the next few weeks, or it could be permanent as his body readjusts. Learn more…

Thor* is a busy puppy who fell off a short ledge during playtime. His owners kept a watchful eye on him and noticed he wasn’t bearing any weight on his front right leg, so they took him to a veterinary hospital for an exam. Unfortunately, the doctor suspected a possible fracture and referred Thor’s family to our Veterinary Medical Center for surgery.

When dogs are young, falls do not have to be extremely high to inflict damage; in fact, even a foot or so can cause sudden injury to their soft bones.

Our veterinary team performed a consultation and discovered that Thor had a right humerus lateral condyle (elbow) fracture. We performed surgery to realign the broken bones and stabilized the fragments using stainless steel implants. Learn more…

The first six weeks of life have sure been tough on little Frederick. Not only was he found and brought in as a stray, but he was also suffering from trauma on his left hind leg.

Frederick would drag his leg behind him as he walked, and his foot was black due to the tissue dying. Our Shelter Medical Staff determined he had a chronic femur fracture, extreme hypertension at his hock, firm swelling at his left femur, and he was unable to flex his hock with severe gastric contracture (limited movement in the ankle joint.)

We are unsure what caused this injury, other than the small hole shown above his leg in the video. Learn more…

 

Rose* paid a visit to our Veterinary Medical Center last week to lose some weight; more specifically, the massive tumor on her stomach. It had grown so large that it started to get sores due to skin stretching and dragging.

Often, people think tumors will go away and clear up on their own; however that is rare. Unfortunately, the tumor will generally reach an extreme size, causing a nuisance for the pet and more extensive surgery to remove. Other times, people wait because of financial reasons.

We strongly urge people to take their pets to the vet sooner rather than later if they notice a growth. In addition, we offer several options Learn more…

Jack was struggling to urinate. He would often lift his legs on walks and his owner noted that he produced no urine. Jack’s owner knew that his 9-year-old lab needed immediate medical care. He took Jack to an emergency vet where Jack’s urethra was flushed so he could urinate, but surgery was needed to remove the bladder stones.

Jackie’s owner brought him to the Idaho Humane Society because he was told that Jack would receive excellent medical care from a highly experienced veterinary surgical team. Urgent surgical cases like Jack are seen every day at our state-of-the-art facility. We’re happy to report that the surgery was successful, and Jack is now home recovering. Learn more…

The first six weeks of life have sure been tough on little Frederick. Not only was he found and brought in as a stray, but he was also suffering from trauma on his left hind leg.

Frederick would drag his leg behind him as he walked, and his foot was black due to the tissue dying. Our Shelter Medical Staff determined he had a chronic femur fracture, extreme hypertension at his hock, firm swelling at his left femur, and he was unable to flex his hock with severe gastric contracture (limited movement in the ankle joint.)

We are unsure what caused this injury, other than the small hole shown above his leg in the video. Learn more…

 

Rose (name changed) paid a visit to our Veterinary Medical Center last week to lose some weight; more specifically, the massive tumor on her stomach. It had grown so large that it started to get sores due to skin stretching and dragging.

Often, people think tumors will go away and clear up on their own; however that is rare. Unfortunately, the tumor will generally reach an extreme size, causing a nuisance for the pet and more extensive surgery to remove. Other times, people wait because of financial reasons.

We strongly urge people to take their pets to the vet sooner rather than later if they notice a growth. In addition, we offer several options Learn more…

Sophie (name changed) is an 8-week old ball of cuteness that arrived at our Veterinary Medical Center with a badly injured eye. Our vet staff performed a thorough exam and determined the eye had been damaged beyond repair and was causing her pain.

We did an enucleation surgery to remove her eye in order to allow her to live a more comfortable and pain-free life.

Due to her small stature, being put under for surgery could be very hard on her tiny body; however, she is a fighter and pulled through just fine. Now she is back with her family and recovering at home! Learn more…

(WARNING: graphic images!)  Disbelief. That’s one word to describe what our Veterinary Medical Center felt when 11-year-old Ace arrived at our veterinary hospital; he had a large stick protruding from the right side of his stomach. The family transferred him from an emergency hospital to our clinic because we had payment plan options, instead of having to come up with all the funds all at once.

Our veterinary staff performed an exam to set up the strategy for Ace’s surgery. Miraculously, the stick protruded at an angle, missing all his organs. Learn more…

 

Dracula came into our Shelter Medical Center with a broken fibula and tibia. We provided care and casting for this sweet cat and monitored for healing. Dracula was cleared for adoption (yes that was the name he came in with!) and waiting to get moved to our adoption floor, when a kitten was brought in, on the brink of dying. She was covered in fleas, anemic, and in desperate need of medical intervention.

Dracula provided blood for a blood transfusion with the hopes that it would be enough to give her a fighting chance. After recovering from donating blood, he was adopted within hours! Congratulations to Dracula and his new loving family. Learn more…

 

Pebbles’ lethargy didn’t go unnoticed at our shelter. Upon further exam, we discovered a swollen and tender abdomen and jumped into action, suspecting she needed emergency care. Our Shelter Medical Center performed an ultrasound, allowing them to confirm she had a pyometra, where her uterus was large, infected, and filled with pus.

A healthy uterus in a female dog is the shape of a “V” and is typically a finger’s width along each side. As you can see in the picture, Pebbles’ was monumentally bigger than Dr. McCrath’s hand, let alone just a single finger. Learn more…

What was supposed to be a routine neuter for 11-month-old Jasper turned into a need for emergency heart surgery.

Our Washington State University vet students performed an exam under the supervision of Dr. Castillo; they noticed a very loud and continuous heart murmur, leading them to believe he had a congenital heart condition called “patent ductus arteriosus” or PDA. To explain, as Jasper developed in utero, the PDA blood vessel worked to move blood past the lungs and back to the rest of the body. At the time of birth and upon his first breath, the PDA is supposed to close, allowing blood to flow into the lungs. With a PDA, the ductus arteriosus stays open and diverts blood away from the lungs. Read more…

 

Antoinette raised kittens in foster, then came in for her routine spay when our veterinary staff made a shocking discovery; her sternum was abnormal with a bony point. We immediately took x-rays, and it revealed that not only had her sternum been broken at some point, but she had a ruptured diaphragm, meaning most of her liver and some intestines were in her chest near her heart.

This type of injury is usually due to blunt force trauma to the chest or abdomen, such as being hit by a car, falling from a tree, getting kicked, etc. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery to replace the abdominal organs into the abdomen and sewed her diaphragm back up. Learn more…

 

Rosco has been through a lot in his short 11 months of life, and he’s been with us for almost half of it. He arrived as a transfer from another shelter in dire need of medical intervention to correct the positioning of his front legs. We diagnosed Rosco with having front leg deformities; his ulna stopped growing prematurely in both of his forelegs, which resulted in a sizeable abnormal bow in his legs.

Being a young pup full of energy and no manners, Rosco needed to work on his jumping habits and mouthiness before surgery to aid during recovery. A foster home welcomed him with open arms and provided love and training to prevent any further injury. Learn more…

Billy came to us with an open and worrisome-looking wound above his tail. He lives as an indoor and outdoor kitty, and after one of his trips outside, he returned home wounded. His owners brought him in for fear that he was infected with maggots.

After close monitoring by our Veterinary Medical Shelter and no sight of maggots, we cleaned the wound so it could heal properly and returned him to his family.
Not every case like this has a happy ending. Cats that are allowed to venture outdoors have shorter life expectancies and a substantially higher risk of injury. Read more…

 

Sid (Garth) came to us after suffering horrific abuse; his body was littered with ammunition, including a .22 shell, three pellets, and a large swath of shotgun blast. His left eye was damaged due to the shotgun pellets, leaving him with irreparable damage and in a severe amount of pain. His left ear was also severely hit, leaving shot wounds in his ear, but thankfully, it could be cleaned and wrapped for recovery.

Our Shelter Medical Center provided an enucleation surgery to remove Sid’s injured eye, allowing him to be more comfortable and live a pain-free life. Sid now has a new lease on life; we will be transferring him back to Friends Furever Animal Rescue for adoption. Learn more…

 

Dreyfus came into our shelter as a stray on June 7th. She had an upper respiratory infection which is not uncommon to see in felines, as well as conjunctivitis (an eye inflammation). We prescribed antibiotics and provided TLC during her recovery process.

If you’d like to help kittens through their kitty colds and prepare them for adoption, we are still in need of foster parents! Learn more or sign up today.

It was a terrible discovery. The veterinarian immediately knew that this was no accident; these injures were deliberate and forceful. Worse, there were old and new injuries, meaning poor Luna* had been suffering from long-time abuse.

Luna had FOURTEEN fractured ribs, blunt force trauma to the eye and liver, three fractured teeth, three fractures on her left hind foot, it was horrific, disturbing abuse. Learn more…

Introducing Moe Jo! She was transferred to us from another shelter because she had an injured leg. Her back left leg was stiff and didn’t bend at the knee, due to a prior break in the leg. It was an irreparable and painful injury causing her discomfort. Our Shelter Medical Staff performed an amputation to allow her to live more comfortably and without pain.

She is a very smart girl! Her loves are playing fetch and going for walks. She doesn’t let her new 3-legged life hold her back! Moe Jo also enjoys toys and affection. Learn more…

 

This is Zeke, a 10-year-old super sweet and shy boy that loves to be pet. He came to IHS as a stray, so we do not have information on how he is with other animals or children.

When he arrived, he had a wound on his right hip. Our Veterinary Medical Staff cared for it and have him on antibiotics while it finishes healing. Learn more…

WARNING: GRAPHIC VIDEO. Gordo was in desperate need of medical care. He came to our shelter with a severely infected, profound wound in his left armpit. We flushed and bandaged the wound daily for weeks, then at subsequent intervals for several months. 

His wound is nearly healed. There is still a small area of pink, fresh scarring, which should mature to a firm white scar over time. Due to the shape of this area and its scarring, some skin and oil may get trapped in this area. He would benefit from regular bathing or spot cleaning Learn more…

Meet Captain; he is a shelter favorite for his playfulness and loving nature—despite his rough life. Our Shelter Medical Staff knew he needed immediate medical intervention: he came to us as a transfer and had recently been through a traumatic experience. His right front foot was missing, his face was swollen, he was covered in scabs and scars, and he had several ticks embedded that we removed.

Captain’s face was swollen, stemming from dental issues. We discovered that most of his teeth were missing and extracted a few more cracked and painful teeth while providing a dental cleaning. Learn more…

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. A Good Samaritan discovered this cat greatly suffering because his leg was crushed in a steel-jaw leg hold trap off Five Mile between Overland and Victory. Every year we rescue pets that have been injured by traps, and we consider this type of incident to be among the most cruel abuses of animals in our city.

Traps MUST have identifying marks on them to be considered legal by Idaho Fish and Game; these traps held no such marks. While the updated Boise City Ordinance recently improved, pets and wildlife in our community could be protected from cruel treatment by adding a ban Learn more…

Meet Paddy! He is a friendly and handsome boy who received some extra love from our Director of Shelter Medicine, Dr. Alix McGrath.

He arrived as a stray with a serious injury to his front leg, causing him a lot of pain and discomfort. Unfortunately, the wound was too severe and his leg was amputated to live a pain-free life.

Paddy is also FIV+ which means he needs to be an indoor-only cat. Learn more…

“Can you tell me the story of how you rescued me again?” If our shelter animals could talk, they’d tell a tale of how they received life-saving medical care for a second chance at a life at our shelter.

At barely over a year old, Mabel has endured more pain and obstacles than any pet should in a lifetime; she had been hit by a car and suffered severe injuries to her pelvis and hind end. We provided urgent surgery to repair her pelvic fractures, but unfortunately, the injury to her right hip socket was so severe it was not salvageable. In order to make her more comfortable and functional, her leg was amputated.

Thankfully, she adjusted to tripod life fairly effortlessly since she hadn’t been bearing any weight on her damaged leg. Learn more…

We are so thankful that we are able to coordinate with other shelters in Idaho and beyond to work together to find forever homes for our animal friends. Last year, we transferred 1,015 animals into our shelter! We could not have achieved this without the countless hours spent by staff and volunteers to make this happen.

Cowgirl is one of our recent transfer cases. She came to us unable to stand because of fractures on both her hind legs. Our Veterinary Medical Staff immediately performed a full examination, studied her x-rays, and determined she needed a double orthopedic surgery. Learn more…

Last year, we provided more than 1.5 million dollars worth of free or discounted veterinary medical care to low-income families and shelter pets. There’s nothing more heartwarming than reuniting a family pet with its grateful owners after life-saving surgery, many of whom had nowhere else to turn other than the Idaho Humane Society. One of our wonderful clients wrote us recently:

“Okie has been in my life for over six years. He is my unofficial therapy dog. He helped me cope with an abusive ex-husband… and got me through depression and anxiety and the fallout from dealing with it all. He has a unique personality, almost catlike. He enjoys lying on the back of the couch, climbing trees, barking at dogs on TV, and getting on my kitchen counter. He is a small dog with a big presence. I can’t imagine life without him. Learn more…

This handsome boy is Brax. He was transferred to us because unfortunately, his eyes were infected with a lot of discharge. After a thorough exam by our Shelter Medical team, they discovered he was already blind after long-term exposure and in an immense amount of pain. We performed an enucleation surgery to remove both eyes, allowing him to live a pain-free life.

Now, Brax is a loving fellow with a playful side. This guy does not let his blindness hold him back, his zest for life is contagious! He is often playing and keeping himself busy with toys. Brax has a purr that can be heard miles away and loves attention. While he can get a little overstimulated, Brax will make a great addition to a family with slightly older, cat savvy kids. Learn more…

Corndog found her new family after nearly a two-month stay with us; she received medical care after being transferred to us with a dislocated ankle. Our Shelter Medical Center staff reduced the dislocation and placed the joint in a splint for several weeks. After the joint became stabilized, Corndog went to a foster home for recovery.

Several weeks later, Corndog returned for a recheck and received an exam and x-rays to determine if she would need surgery or if the splint provided healing and correction. Corndog impressed the staff with her remarkable recovery; she didn’t need surgery! Learn more…

Needing medical intervention to live a pain-free and full functioning life, this cute pup was brought into our Shelter Medical Center from the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. Dottie, an 8-month-old border collie, was suffering and in severe pain from a right hind leg femur fracture. While in our care, we were able to repair the fracture and spay her.

After a couple of weeks of monitoring by our veterinary staff, Dottie was transferred back to her home where she will spend the next 6-14 weeks recovering. Each animal’s healing process can range quite a bit, but until their bone is fully healed, their mobility is extremely limited. Learn more…

Toph’s eyes were in bad shape when she arrived as a stray. They were sunken in, red, swollen, very cloudy, and full of green discharge. She didn’t want to be handled and was hissing and swatting, but our staff didn’t give up on her.

Her corneas didn’t look normal, and when combined with pain and other symptoms, our Shelter Medical Center performed an enucleation surgery, removing both blind and painful eyes.

It turns out she wasn’t a mean stray at all; she was just in horrible pain and didn’t want to be handled. She is very social and sweet and loves attention! Learn more…

With multiple bone breaks and in dire need of immediate medical intervention, Inky (formerly Bumble) was transferred to our Shelter Medical Center. He had several fractures on his right femur and his left ankle. Several toes were degloved (where the skin is removed from the muscle) down to the bone–it was barely hanging on by a small dried piece of tissue. Poor thing!

We performed emergency surgery to help ease Inky’s pain and correct the injuries. A greater trochanter repair was conducted on the right femur, a femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHO) on the right hip, and cross pinning of the fracture on the left ankle. We are so happy to report that he recovered excellently and now is enjoying life with his new family! Learn more…

Marvin the Martian experienced several urinary blockages before being transferred to our Veterinary Medical Shelter. Once in our care, we determined he needed a Perineal Urethrostomy surgery. This procedure is a surgical reconstruction of the genitalia to create a wider urinary opening. Urinary blockages are common in male cats; however, it is not common for cats to have to go to the extent of a Perineal Urethorsotomy surgery.
If you have a male cat, look for the following signs of a blockage: straining to urinate, bloody urine, urinating in unusual places, and howling in pain when trying to urinate. Learn more…

For nearly a year, we have been driving to Duck Valley Indian Reservation every two weeks to spay/neuter approximately 40 animals, either personally owned pets or animals that are being rehomed at our Adoption Center.

Last week, we set cat traps and caught this kitten clinging to life after suffering from what appears to be an animal attack. If you’d like to see her intake pictures WARNING GRAPHIC: visit http://bit.ly/IHS-Halo

After arriving safely back at our shelter, she underwent life-saving surgery. Unfortunately, she contracted severe pneumonia, which is not uncommon, given the significant obstacles she has faced thus far in life. Learn more…

Harvey (formerly Phantom) was transferred to us from a Treasure Valley shelter with a fractured femur. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery to place a metal plate and screws into his bone to heal his broken bone. A loving foster home took him in to aid in his recovery process for rest and healing. This surgery requires several months after the bone heals to remodel and strengthen over time. We’re happy to report that this striking boy has been adopted out of foster care and is now living with his new family!

Congrats Harvey and family; we are so happy for you all! Learn more…

This cute boy, Willy, was a transferred after the previous shelter noticed a large swelling on his neck. When he arrived, our Shelter Medical staff aspirated the swelling and found saliva. This meant that his salivary gland or duct had ruptured and was leaking saliva into his tissues. We removed the damaged salivary glands on that side and he is doing well. This injury is usually due to trauma to the neck or face and it seems like this guy has been through the ringer; we also removed an eye as it looked like it had been ruptured previously and we took out a severely abscessed tooth.

We are so happy to report he is feeling much better now and adjusting to his new outlook Read more…

This striking boy is Harry (formerly known as Oliver) and he arrived as a stray in rough condition. He had a dislocated hip and a diaphragmatic hernia, meaning he was probably hit by a car. His hernia had ruptured and his stomach, liver and intestines were in his chest taking up the space that his lungs should be in. Our Shelter Medical staff performed emergency lifesaving surgery to repair the hernia and did an FHO (femoral head ostectomy) surgery on his left hind leg. He recovered beautifully and is now living life in his new forever home.

His new owner said, “He is such a lover and constantly wants to be pet and gives loving head-butts to tell you he wants attention! Read more…

The Idaho Youth Ranch Hays House welcomed a sweet, cuddly blonde to their staff… meet Maeve!

Maeve came to IHS after her original owner could no longer care for her due to cancer, and she wanted to give Maeve a new chapter filled with love. We were hopeful that the kids at the Hays House would welcome her in with open arms; after all, she’s an expert at giving hugs and kisses and easing stress and worries away. They were beyond thrilled to meet her, and even better, she and Bear (her new dog-brother and IHS Alum) are getting along like peaches and cream! Learn more…

When our humane officers first saw them, they were almost unrecognizable as dogs. Fearful, they attempted to elude capture, running towards traffic. The only good thing about the extremely tangled and filthy matted fur that encased their bodies was that it slowed them down enough so that our officers could rescue them from the streets.    A failure to provide basic grooming can result in a torture-like condition for neglected pets. Twisted mats of fur cause skin infections, harbor parasites, cause abrasions and lacerations, and can even form tourniquets around limbs that then require amputation. Severe matting can even be life-threatening. We rescue pets in this miserable condition every year. Watch video…

Lea, like many of our feline friends, loves to snack on hairbands. Unfortunately, hairbands are not easily passable and frequently get stuck in the intestine, which is quite painful. Our Veterinary Medical Shelter performed an urgent enteronomy to locate the obstruction and remove the hairbands… a lot of them!

We’ve seen several cats over the last month in our veterinary clinic for this exact reason; however, hairbands aren’t the only household items cats tend to eat. It’s essential to pay attention to your pet’s habits: notice what items they are drawn to or chew on, and try to keep them tucked away safely out of their reach. Learn more…

Badly injured with severe wounds on his face, Theo needed immediate medical attention. This poor stray cat had likely been bitten, and his face became swollen due to the trauma he endured. Thankfully our amazing Shelter Medical team was able to clean and provide care, which he responded to wonderfully. The trauma brought on congestion, but our vets are hopeful that it will subside in the next two weeks. There is, however, a small chance of some chronic congestion or inflammation in the sinuses or nasal passages due to permanent damage.

Theo is also FIV+, which means he must be an indoor-only cat and unfortunately cannot go to a home with other cats that do not have FIV. Watch video…

Billy was transferred to us from an underserved community without the resources to treat his medical condition. They knew Billy needed surgery as he hopped like a rabbit with his hind legs jumping up and down. Thanks to your support, we are a resource for overcrowded and underfunded shelters to step in and provide needed surgical care to prevent unnecessary euthanasia.

We performed a surgery called Femoral Head and Neck Ostctomy (FHO) surgery to repair the femoral head and neck at the hip joint. This surgery provides relief because the bones no longer grind together. You wouldn’t know how much pain Billy was in because he such a sweet boy—always snuggled by your side for love and affection. Learn more…

Panda came to us with a rectal prolapse, where part of her colon fell out of her anus. The issue didn’t correct itself, so Panda came to us for medical care. Our Shelter Medical Center tried to reduce the prolapse several times, but unfortunately, the issue remained.

We performed a colopexy surgery to ensure that Panda would have a new life without this issue. We sutured the colon to the abdominal body wall to keep it in place and make prolapse impossible. We are so happy Panda is all healed up and gets to enjoy life in her new forever home! Learn more…

Baily was surrendered to us in October of 2020 for health reasons. Her walk was very bowlegged and eerily similar to that of a crab. Our veterinarians performed an exam and discovered she needed two MPLS (bilateral medial luxating patellas,) which means ‘out of place’ or ‘dislocated,’ as well as a TPLO. In Baily’s case, her kneecaps were moving out of their normal location. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery and sent her to foster care for recovery and TLC.

It’s been three months and we’re delighted to announce Baily is medically released and ready to be adopted! Now she can run and explore without any hindrance from her legs Learn more…

Roly Poly Oly quickly became a shelter favorite after making his way to us as a transfer from California. He had been hit by a car and was believed to have had a fractured shoulder, but Dr. McGrath discovered he had two fractured shoulders and a broken pelvic bone.

He was just six-months-old when Dr. McGrath performed a bilateral humeral fracture repair on his right and left shoulder. Unfortunately, as Roly started on his road to recovery, he got pneumonia; however, it was caught quickly and treated. Roly couldn’t walk for two weeks, so our hospital staff used a harness to hold up his legs, which allowed him to walk outside to go potty and receive enrichment from the great outdoors. This little boy was so loved, they held water in their hands for him to drink, doted constantly on him with love Learn more…

This sweet girl, Tiny, came to us after her owner noticed she had a hard stomach and wasn’t eating. Tiny was also lethargic, shivering and was whining frequently. After a thorough exam, our Veterinary Medical Shelter diagnosed her as having an infected uterus, known as a pyometra, which is a life-threatening uterine infection that affects older, un-spayed female dogs. We performed emergency surgery and are happy to report that Tiny is doing great.

If a pyometra isn’t treated immediately, your beloved pet could pass away suddenly. To officially diagnose, a veterinarian will run complete blood work, urinalysis, conduct a radiograph, and an ultrasound. We see a great number of dogs needing life-saving surgery with pyometras each week, leaving the owner in unexpected financial and emotional distress. Read more…

This little ball of wiggles, Mariposa, came to us last September after a young child accidentally stepped on her. These kinds of accidents are quite common, especially when dogs are small and fragile at a young age. Weighing just three pounds, she underwent a fracture repair surgery… imagine her little bone being repaired that was just about the size of a toothpick! She was a trooper through the whole procedure and was on her way to recovery.

This week Mariposa paid us another visit for preventative health, as all animals receiving care at our Veterinary Medical Center must agree to get spayed/neutered. Today, she is 8 months old and weighed in at a whopping 4 pounds! Learn more…

Coco Bean came to us with fishing line wrapped tightly around his leg. Our veterinarians determined that surgery was needed to safely remove the line and ensure that no hooks were embedded. We kept a watchful eye and closely monitored his leg and toes to see if there would be any tissue damage. Coco Bean recovered well with the use of his leg and thankfully, there was no permanent damage. He’s back to being a happy and sweet kitten who loves attention!

This is a great reminder to those who fish or use fishing line for crafts or other projects. Please keep the line out of your pet’s reach and safely dispose of any old or unused line; it is hazardous and potentially fatal to pets and wildlife if left unattended. Learn more…

At just four years old, Marnie has sure been through a lot in her short lifetime. She originally came to us after the death of her owner in October, 2019. She was terrified of the shelter environment and would hide under her blanket to avoid having anyone see her. We immediately began working with her to find a foster home so that she could relax from this high-stress situation to decompress and prepare for her upcoming TPLO (Tibial Plateau Levelling Osteotomy) and double bilateral MPL surgery to repair her back knees.

The surgery was a success, and we sent Marnie back to foster care for recovery. She was nearly done with her journey and enjoying her new knees outdoors…when  suddenly Watch video…

Many of you have heard of Parvo and how deadly it can be with dogs. Panleukopenia (panleuk) is the cat version of Parvo; it’s just as deadly if untreated or unvaccinated and can live for a long time on surfaces.

Panleuk used to be the leading cause of death in cats; many shelters don’t have space or resources to treat felines infected with Panleuk. Unfortunately, these felines are usually humanely euthanized on intake because of how contagious this virus is.

The Idaho Humane Society is proud to treat Parvo/Panleuk at our intake facility Learn more…

Sabrina came to us after her owner noticed she began urinating outside of her little box and around the house. When her owner discovered blood in her urine, she was taken to West Vet where she was given an ultrasound and was diagnosed with bladder stones.

Looking for more affordable care, her owner brought her to our Veterinary Medical Shelter where we provided surgery to remove the stones. Bladder stones are quite painful for pets; here are some signs to watch out for:

• frequent urination, especially in odd places
• blood in the urine
• painful urination

If bladder stones are left untreated, they can become fatal. Read more…

Miss Harley came to us with cheat grass embedded in her ear. After our Veterinary Medical Staff removed the cheat grass, they put her in a “no-flap-ear-wrap” to allow the ear to heal without her scratching it or the ear being shaken too much.

Cheat grass can cause a tremendous amount of issues and pain. It can become stuck anywhere from the ear, to getting wedged between toes, in paws, the hair, mouth, and even the nose! It’s important to thoroughly check your dog after outdoor adventures (and cats if they go outside your home!). Brushing is a great way to remove any that might be on their coat, but closely examine the common problem areas listed above. Read more…

A New Year’s Eve surgery brought Willy new wrist joints that would allow him to walk independently. After jumping from a balcony a few weeks back, he suffered severe hypertension to both of his front wrist joints and couldn’t walk on his own unless he was wearing splints. When these supporting ligaments are torn, they hardly ever heal, and if they do heal through scar tissue, they lack the strength to adequately stabilize the joints, resulting in chronic pain and severe disability.

Thankfully, Willy was able to receive a joint fusion surgery at our Veterinary Medical Center. This solution gave Willy the chance to walk on his own without pain or splints, providing a new chapter filled with fun, exercise, and bonding with his owner. Read more… or watch update video.

This handsome boy, Oso, came to us after contracting parvo at 6 months old. We’re happy to announce that Oso survived Parvo and has found his forever home!
Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease that is most likely to affect young puppies and unvaccinated dogs. It’s very important to take precautions to prevent the disease and to respond immediately if your dog starts to show any symptoms.

Here is what you should know:
– Young puppies are at the highest risk of parvo. Read more…

If your pup likes munching on sticks and branches, don’t miss out on this story!

Just last week, a sweet pup came to our Veterinary Medical Center after its owner noticed it wasn’t eating much and was continually smacking its lips and licking around his mouth. Upon examination, our veterinary staff discovered a stick lodged between his teeth on the roof of his mouth near his throat. We removed the stick and this pup is back to his happy self!

Dogs love chasing and chewing on sticks, but it’s always a good idea to check them after being outdoors. This will help to ensure nothing is stuck in their mouth, paws, or ears, and that there’s no lacerations from chewing on random objects. If you do happen to notice something, the quicker a vet can see your pet, the better! Learn more…

Bailey is lucky to be alive. This sweet 8-month-old pup was enjoying a car ride with his owner. Suddenly, while leaning against the backseat window, his paw hit the automatic button and the window rolled down! Unfortunately, he lost his balance and fell out of the window while the car was moving.

His owner needed help urgently and brought him to our Veterinary Medical Center. Our staff discovered that part of his right front leg was hanging in an unnatural position, and he wouldn’t put any weight on it. Veterinarians determined that his leg had no chance of healing with surgery, so unfortunately, amputation was the best course of action. Read more…

2020

Kaylani came to us in a lot of pain. She had found her way into what we believe was the garbage bin. She ate string, ribbon, plastic, and a watchband, and unfortunately, the objects became stuck in her stomach and small intestine. We performed a gastronomy and enteronomy (stomach and small intestine surgery) in our Shelter Medical Center to remove the objects but discovered the plastic has sharp edges and had punctured holes in her soft tissue which complicated her recovery, and resulted in a second surgery just 4 days later.

We’re happy to report that this happy girl has a new chapter in life and is ready to find her forever home! Read more…

Tanner has a new lease on life and is celebrating Christmas at home with his family! This sweet boy gave us all a good reminder (especially around the holidays!) that we aren’t the only ones who struggle with our sweet tooth cravings; dogs will eat candy, and sometimes the wrapper if it’s in their reach.

Tanner’s owners noticed he wasn’t interested in eating one day, and late the next morning, they discovered that he had vomited. They brought Tanner to West Vet where he was diagnosed with a foreign body obstruction. Looking for a more affordable option, they were referred to our Veterinary Medical Center where he received emergency surgery. Our veterinarians performed an enteronomy to discover what was blocked inside his intestines. They removed multiple gummy wrapper bags, and we’re happy to report that he is now on the mend and back at home! Read more…

Charming is a 6-year-old feline who was a happy, loving cat; unfortunately, he experienced some unknown stress that caused him to have health issues. His family quickly realized he was having a difficult time urinating. He would squat to pee in odd places, on pillows, in the dirty laundry basket, on stuffed animals; however, there wasn’t much pee that would come out. With concern, his family brought him to see the doctor.

The doctor determined that he had a urinary tract infection; he was prescribed antibiotics. The infection didn’t clear up; his family brought him back in. They did another test, which determined that he had struvite crystals. Struvite is a urinary mineral composed of ammonium, phosphate, and magnesium – which will bind together and create crystals. The doctor prescribed a prescription diet to help dissolve the crystals. Read more…

Garfield arrived in October as a transfer from Eastern Idaho. The Bonneville County Shelter reached out to us to see if we could help with his fractured leg. Unfortunately, after our veterinarians performed an exam, they were unsure if the leg could be saved. We sent him to foster care for TLC and rest to see if he would recover on his own, since surgery wouldn’t help in his case.

Garfield continued to favor his right hind leg and would not put any weight on it, which lead to the decision to amputate his leg. He had a successful surgery and is now cleared to find his forever home. Watch video…

When we saw Arabella, we knew she needed immediate veterinary care; she had a metal wire protruding from her left front leg! However, she was still bright, alert, responsive, and loved to give kisses. Dr. Castillo took x-rays and performed a veterinary exam at our Shelter Medical Center. She discovered a plate, screws, and wire in Arabella’s front leg, from what appears to be a former fracture in Arabella’s left radius and ulna.

Luckily, there were no signs of infection, and with her fracture healed, Dr. Rosenthal was able to remove the plate, screws, and wire. After her surgery and a few sutures, Arabella was back on her feet and quickly found her forever home. Read more…

Alden originally came to our shelter as a stray. He’s a big, sweet Mastiff weighing 120 pounds at one and a half-years-old! After multiple attempts to find his owners, we started to look for his forever home. Alden was adopted out quickly; unfortunately, it didn’t last forever. His adopters discovered that he seemed to be in pain when walking upstairs and didn’t enjoy interacting with his new family’s kids and cats.

When Alden returned, we gave him another veterinary exam. From the exterior, his gait looked normal. However, Dr. Castillo thought it was worth taking some x-rays to rule out an injury. It turns out Alden had an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, meaning he needed to have Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) surgery. Read more…

Hershey is lucky to be alive. She was riding in the back of a pickup about 35 MPH and fell out. Not realizing she had fallen out, they kept driving until a Good Samaritan flagged down the driver. Realizing she was greatly hurt, Hershey’s owner immediately brought her into our Veterinarian Medical Center, where she was assessed and made comfortable. She sustained severe damage from being drug several miles and after receiving the veterinary estimate and given a time/pain management regime, her owner decided to surrender her to us medically.

Hershey’s four paws were mutilated with bone exposed on one of her back feet. Dr. McGrath, Director of Shelter Medicine, changed Hershey’s bandages daily until her wounds produced healthy granulation, and over time, Dr. McGrath extended the time between bandage changes because she was healing so well. Read more…

Tiberius’ leg was severely fractured, and there was severe trauma to his skull including a shattered jaw. He was barely recognizable. But he recognized her and despite his injuries tried to climb into her arms. What followed was a long series of difficult surgeries. Though the prognosis wasn’t good, the vets decided that “If he is going to keep fighting, we will keep fighting for him.”

Today Tiberius, or Tibby for short, is a happy member of the Barlow family. The injuries to his jaw left him with a tongue that’s askew, but he has regained almost all of his motor skills and feline grace. Perhaps too much so; he’s been known to literally swing from the chandeliers of their family home, happily demonstrating the zest for life that no doubt helped him survive such a grueling ordeal and fight his way back to his new forever home. Read more…

Forrest is lucky he came to IHS as a stray this month. During a routine neuter, Dr. McGrath discovered that he was born with a congenital condition called “pectus excavatum” where the sternum curves upward towards the spine instead of downwards toward the belly. Forrest’s condition is severe and unfortunately. this leaves less room for the heart and lungs to work which can cause cardiac and respiratory issues since the lungs or heart cannot fill as they should.

The window to correct this condition is relatively small and surgery must occur before they are four months old; thankfully is only 2.5 months! Read more…

Opal came to our shelter as an owner surrender. His family was moving and could not take her with them. Dr. McGrath completed a veterinarian exam after Opal arrived. Unfortunately, she found a cancerous mass on her left shoulder. Dr. McGrath was able to remove the mass without complications successfully. Opal recovered beautifully and is now living with her forever home.

It’s not uncommon to see stray cats arrive with bite wounds on their face or neck from other cats, but Percy was suffering from a gruesome infection in his sizable neck wound. This four-year-old boy was covered with maggots and in a great deal of pain. Dr. McGrath, our Director of Shelter Medicine, flushed the wound, removed the larva, and bandaged him for the first of several wound cleanings to come.

It took several weeks and procedures to clean the wound and free it of infection; however, the wound was still too large to close even with these steps. Dr. McGrath took a flap of skin from Percy’s neck/shoulder area to close the open wound for healing. Read more…

Archie came to us after a Good Samaritan called Animal Care and Control for assistance after a cat had been found injured and limping. Dr. McGrath, our Director of Shelter Medicine, diagnosed him with a Brachial plexus avulsion; a condition where the nerve had been separated from the spinal cord, typically from a high-speed impact. Our team monitored him and provided pain medication to ease his stay, hoping that he would regain the use of his arm.

Unfortunately, his owner didn’t come to redeem him, so we sent him to foster care for some TLC and careful watching to see if his arm would improve outside of the shelter. Eventually, Archie came back for another evaluation and Dr. McGrath determined the best course of action would be a leg amputation so he could live a pain-free life. Read more…

On a Monday evening in October, our Humane Officers received an urgent call. A Boise resident reported a horrifying sight – an orange and white cat in terrible distress with what appeared to be a pencil sticking out of its left eye. Our officers responded and rescued the cat and rushed him to our Shelter Medical Center.

An Idaho Humane Society veterinarian examined the injured cat and determined the object was, in fact, a crossbow arrow. Tragically, the potentially lethal projectile had penetrated through the feline’s eye, but an x-ray showed that it miraculously did not enter his brain. The arrow was removed under anesthesia, and the wounded cat was treated with antibiotics, pain medication, and IV fluids. The following morning, the cat was purring and rubbing up against our staff as they cared for him. Surgery to remove the remnants of his ruptured eye was performed on the obviously friendly and well-socialized patient. Read more…

Buck came to our Shelter Medical Center for emergency care since he had swallowed a 3-pronged (treble) fish hook! This was a sticky situation as our shelter didn’t have the perfect piece of veterinary equipment needed to remove the hook from his esophagus, but thanks to the quick thinking of Dr. McGrath, our Director of Shelter Medicine, Dr. Palchek and their veterinary assistant, the three of them were able to sedate Buck and safely remove it using the veterinary tools on hand.

Thankfully, Buck recovered quickly and made his way to the adoption floor.

We’re thrilled to report that he was adopted just 48 hours later! Congrats to Buck and his forever family!!!

Cody’s 2020 wasn’t going so great… earlier this summer, he was attacked by a dog which resulted in his leg being amputated after a lot of damage was inflicted on him. The good news is that now he’s resting comfortably in foster care after being sent for recovery.

His foster family has taken him in with open arms and given him the love he needs. Cody adores lap time and likes to sleep with his head in the palm of a hand. He enjoys being held, purrs a lot, gives licks and tiny nips, and loves having his face, neck, and belly rubbed. Read more…

Meet Sadie. She is a 13-week-old Husky and is as cute as a button. Sadie attempted to jump out of her owner’s truck bed while it was parked and severely injured her leg. Poor pup! She came to our Veterinary Clinic and had orthopedic surgery for a femur fracture. The surgery went well, and Sadie is ready to get back to her puppy duties of playing and, most importantly, being adorable!

Puppies can injure themselves quite easily at a young age because their growth plates aren’t closed and bones are still growing. It’s important to keep an eye on the activities of young dogs to ensure they aren’t running for too long or jumping from too high of surfaces, as the strain can lead to injury. Read more…

These two sweet boys do not know each other, but they have one traumatic aspect of their life in common. While outside enjoying some fresh air, they were shot. Their owners brought them about a week apart thinking their cat had been entangled in a fight. Our Veterinarian Medical Center performed exams, where the owners were shocked to find out their cats had been shot. Our veterinarians and medical staff quickly went to work to ease their pain. Oliver had his leg amputated, while Blaze had to have teeth removed as well as severe tissue damage to the face.

Thankfully after surgery, both cats went home to rest and recover comfortably.

Simon’s owners became worried when Simon’s eye was frequently closed and had goopy discharge. When he was brought to our Veterinary Medical Center, our veterinarians discovered his eye was severely infected and unfortunately, was past the point of treatability by medication. It was decided the best course of action was for Simon to undergo an enucleation (eye removal).

We understand that it may be quite shocking to learn that a cat will need an eye removed, but it’s the kindest option if it’s been badly damaged, is causing unmanageable pain, is affected by an untreatable condition or contains a tumor. Read more…

Lacey is ready to find her new forever home! This 9-year-old American Pitbull Terrier mix originally came to us as a stray, and we found a mass on her leg when we gave her our veterinary exam. They removed a sizeable soft-tissue sarcoma from directly over her stifle (knee). This area is challenging to operate on because it puts pressure on the incision site every time her knee bends. Our Director of Shelter Medicine, Dr. McGrath, performed a special technique to relieve the tension by making small incisions in the surrounding skin to stretch the skin like a “mesh” to help it cover the area. While it looks a little different from most other procedures, the small incisions are healing well.

It is excellent news for Lacey; we just received word that her margins are clear, and her cancer is gone! We are releasing her for adoption with a waiver that states adopters should monitor her for regrowth of any new tumors. The pathologist report stated the metastatic rate is very low, and she has a good prognosis. Read more…

Sophie was brought to our Shelter Medical Center as a stray last week by a Good Samaritan. She was badly injured. Both of her right legs were broken; she had fractures in her tibia, fibula, and humerus. Although we are not sure how she sustained her injuries, our best assumption is that she was hit by a car. In addition to her leg injuries, she had many live mites and eggs in her ears. Poor little fluff ball!

Our Shelter Medical Center was able to administer medication for her ear mites, and tended to her broken legs with surgery. Sophie didn’t quite like her bandages and tried to remove them herself, but our Shelter Medical Center team replaced them in no time. Read more…

Meet Snoop— the dog. He might not be the famous rapper, but he does know how to “Drop It Like Its Hot”, even with three legs!

Snoop came to us with an injury, the Good Samaritan who found him believed he was possibly hit by a car. We immediately gave him a veterinary exam in our Shelter Medical Center and his x-rays revealed that he was actually shot in the back leg! The injuries to his leg were so severe that unfortunately, his hind leg had to be removed.

We sent Snoop to foster for recovery and to learn more about his personality; he adjusted very well to being a tripod! Read more…

Meet Ginger, she’s an 11-year-old female terrier who was brought into our Veterinary Medical Center by her family because she started to act out of character. After a thorough exam, our doctors diagnosed her as having an infected uterus, known as pyometra, a life-threatening uterine infection that affects older, un-spayed female dogs.

Symptoms include lethargy, depression, anorexia, excessive water intake, excessive urination, and bloody vaginal discharge. Pyometra is a medical emergency that requires immediate veterinarian attention, otherwise, your beloved pet could pass away suddenly. Read more…

Dunkel was brought to our Veterinary Medical Center by his owners after he was found limping around the house. Our vets determined that he had dislocated his hip. Dunkel is 12-years-old and had an age related injury. His owners mentioned that he may have been prepping his bed for a nap when his hip was dislocated. Usually when we see hip dislocations in our clinic, it is the result of a traumatic accident from being hit by a car, but other times pets can find danger chasing after cars, falling into backyard holes, or other age-related causes.

Thankfully, we have two different ways to correct a pet’s dislocated hip. Closed reduction is non-surgical, and is almost always attempted first. Read more…

Wyatt is a 5 month old kitty, and he’s got grit! This brave mouser had some serious injuries when he was brought to us through our in-state transfer program. He suffered 4 fractures – 3 in one hind leg, and 1 in the other hind leg. He couldn’t walk or stand, and needed intense surgery. Soon after being brought to our Shelter Medical Center, Wyatt underwent surgery performed by Dr. McGrath.

Only a few days later, Wyatt was up and walking again! Thanks to the can-do cattitude of this brave little kitty, the skilled hands of our doctors and staff, and generous donors, Wyatt is recovering at a rapid pace! Congratulations, little guy! Read more…

In July, Beau and his family were on their way to the mountains. Beau was in the back of a truck, and even though his owners did their best to keep him safe and he had no history of jumping, Beau somehow escaped somewhere near Horseshoe Bend! Beau’s family was devastated. They hung flyers, took to social media, contacted the Boise County Sherriff, and held search parties. They received some positive leads but ultimately everything fell through.

Nearly two weeks later, Beau’s owners received a call from Cascade Raft & Kayak. They had rescued Beau from an Island in the middle of the Payette River about 5 miles north of Horseshoe bend! Read more…

After swallowing a bear-shaped pacifier (photo top right), Zeke was not eating or drinking and was vomiting. Poor pup! His owners had CT scans taken, and then brought him to our Veterinary Medical Center for an enterotomy (surgical opening of the intestine), to remove the pacifier.

The surgery went well, and Zeke is recovering like a champ!

Animal Care and Control officers sprung into action after learning of a cat that was walking around a neighborhood with a trap caught on its leg. The cat gave chase, but thankfully our Humane Officer was able to capture it and bring it into our shelter for care. We sedated the cat before we removed the trap to ensure that the animal didn’t further harm itself or our staff. Thankfully, this cat’s injuries were limited to its paw and we were able to provide medical care and reunite it with its owners.

This cat was trapped off Pine Street/Cloverdale, so parents with young children in the area, please be cautious and keep a watchful eye on your children. Pet owners, we urge that cats be left indoors whenever possible; if you have an outdoor cat, please check on them regularly and the routes they may take around your home. Read more…

Poor Rick came to our shelter in rough condition after he was hit by a car in mid-June. A good samaritan brought him to West Vet but, because he was a stray, they transferred him to us so we could offer medical treatment and search for potential owners.

When Rick arrived at our shelter, he had SEVERE head trauma and was neurologically inappropriate. He could not see or walk and was practically comatose. It was very touch and go just how much pain he was in and whether or not he would survive. We opted to treat him with aggressive support: Mannitol to reduce brain swelling and IV fluids. Day by day, we saw more improvements in his neurological status and – finally!- on day 4 or 5 he started walking and eating on his own. Read more…

Can you imagine having a hernia that weighs half as much as you do?? Unfortunately, little Kirby didn’t have to imagine it — it was her reality!

Kirby, a 13-year-old Chihuahua mix, came to our shelter as a stray with a HUGE inguinal hernia. An inguinal hernia occurs when tissue, such as part of the intestine, protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscle. Most of Kirby’s small intestine and all of her uterus was in the hernia. If you look closely at the x-ray photos, you can see that the sac under her belly is filled with intestine. This hernia was the size of a small cantaloupe and it looked even bigger on such a small dog! Kirby had surgery earlier this week to repair her hernia. Read more…

Abby, a 6½-year-old Great Dane mix, had a Gastropexy last week. Gastropexy is a surgical procedure that tacks the stomach to the abdominal wall. These surgeries are performed to reduce the chances of an animal developing Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) in the future. This is also known as torsion or bloat. GDV is a life-threatening surgical emergency where the stomach fills up with gas and then twists, which can cut off blood supply to their vital organs. This is a surgery we commonly perform on Great Danes and other high-risk breeds who enter our shelter in order to help try and prevent a catastrophe in the future. Read more…

Today was a big day for a big dog! Alden is 120 pounds of lovable, cuddly, mastiff-y goodness. Unfortunately, Alden came to our shelter suffering from two anterior cruciate ligament ruptures (both knees!).
Our veterinarians see these injuries all the time because they are the most common orthopedic ailment of dogs. We perform a specialized surgery called Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs with this injury to restore them to pain free mobility. In a giant breed dog like Alden, a double TPLO could easily cost over $10,000 at a private veterinary hospital.

Because of the extraordinary expense it would take for Idaho Humane Society to send such patients to an outside hospital, we have to perform these procedures within our Veterinary Medical Center. We typically perform at least one TPLO on a shelter dog each week; in fact, Alden is the third shelter dog that received a double TPLO surgery just this month! If we didn’t have this capability, dogs like Alden would go to homes where a new owner would immediately be subjected to thousands of dollars in expense, or the pet would suffer from debilitating arthritis for the rest of its life. It can be hard to find a home to adopt a giant breed dog, let alone a new owner that is willing and able to spend thousands of dollars on a newly adopted pet! Read more…

Last week, we transferred a puppy from Burley to our shelter so we could provide life-saving medical care. The puppy, a 10-week-old Chihuahua mix, was extremely dehydrated and emaciated thanks to a raging case of Parvo. She was only 3.5 pounds and had bloody diarrhea and vomit. Her initial prognosis was very poor, but we immediately placed an IV Catheter and prescribed her antibiotics.

We also had to place a feeding tube to help her receive nutrition and give her a fighting chance. She has been hospitalized in our care for about a week and our medical staff regularly checks on her throughout the day. When an animal has parvo, we have to play the waiting game to see if the animal’s immune system is strong enough to fight the virus. Even with medical assistance, parvo can be fatal. Read more…

Smithers came into our shelter as an owner surrender; he became depressed and very stressed. He developed an upper respiratory infection and stopped eating. Fortunately, his cold was resolved in two weeks, but his appetite did not come back. This can sometimes be the beginning of a larger medical issue as cats can become food averse if they develop a condition that causes them to lose their appetite. They recover from the original problem, but the appetite does not come back and in fact the sight/smell of food upsets them.

Our Shelter Medical Center placed a feeding tube into Smithers in order to feed him, eventually sending him to foster. Our staff and foster family did not give up on Smithers. We’re happy to report that after more than 3 months of tube feeding, he finally got his appetite back!

He’s been eating great while in foster care and is back to his normal self. He’s happy, healthy, and looks like a whole new cat. In cases like these, it took some persistence and a lot of hope to get him back to full health. Read more…

Meet Darby – a 10-month-old Catahoula mix who is as friendly as she is cute. This sweet girl was a patient at our public veterinary clinic and we had seen her a number of times for waxing and waning gastrointestinal (GI) issues. Over the past couple of weeks, Darby had been acting strangely. She was vomiting, lethargic, losing weight, and disinterested in food.

She received an abdominal ultrasound by a traveling radiologist who came to our medical center and they diagnosed her with an intussusception. This is a condition where the one section of the bowel telescopes into another intestinal section which then causes an obstruction or blockage. Darby’s owners ultimately decided to surrender her due to personal and financial reasons surrounding the surgery. She was immediately transferred to our Dorman facility so our shelter veterinarians and WSU veterinary students could perform an emergency surgery to resect her obstructed bowel. Read more…

Baine was transferred to IHS earlier this week after he was found on someone’s property, wounded and unable to walk. It was reported that he may have been hit by a car but All Valley veterinarians found a small bullet wound between the eyes as well. The bullet went in through the skull between the eyes and fragmented.

Thankfully, the bullet missed Baine’s brain or else this would have been a fatal wound.
It was unclear if Baine sustained neurological damage as he was unwilling to walk the first two days in our care. However, he was finally able to walk on his own Wednesday morning so his prognosis is looking good. If you look at the x-rays, you can see the fragments are spread throughout his neck. Baine does have some swelling in his neck because of this but surgery is not recommended. The fragments are small enough and hard to find that there is a good chance we would cause more damage if we were to try looking and removing them. Read more…

Ice was surrendered to our shelter in late January due to health and behavior issues at 5 months old. During an evaluation with our shelter trainer, we noticed that Ice was leaking urine and she seemed completely unaware of it. Ice was treated in the past for UTIs and possible incontinence but with no success, so our shelter veterinary staff took x-rays and determined that Ice had an Ectopic Ureter. This means Ice had a ureter that wasn’t connected to the bladder so the urine would leak and drain elsewhere (usually through the urethra). Ice had no bladder control because of this and would unknowingly urinate throughout the day. Read more…

Duckie, a 9-week-old Boxer/Great Pyrenees mix puppy, was surrendered to our shelter almost a month ago because his previous owners were concerned about his health. Duckie acted like a normal puppy in every way except for one: his previous owners had never seen him have a bowel movement. On his medical exam, we discovered Duckie was born without an anus. Yes, you read that right.

Duckie was born with a genetic defect called an ‘imperforate anus’. This means that he has a fully functioning digestive system except for the lack of an anal opening which never developed during gestation. Read more…

We’d like to share another IHS success story with all of you. Sweet Cheeks, a 3-year-old Domestic Longhair mix, was brought to All Valley Animal Hospital when a good samaritan found him stuck in a fence with an injured right hind leg. He was transferred to our shelter for further medical care, but his leg was already so damaged that amputation was the only option.
Dr. Castillo amputated Sweet Cheeks’ leg on January 27th and he was then placed in a foster home where he could comfortably heal. Read more…

Max was discovered wandering the streets, severely neglected, and hungry. His once white coat was soiled with mud and terribly matted. He has open sores on his face and body, which were infected and infested with maggots. Many of his teeth were missing due to untreated dental disease, and most of those that remained were abcessed. After running for days, perhaps weeks, his paws were blistered and torn. Max was in pain, starving, and just trying desperately to survive.
GRAPHIC PHOTO WARNING: If you’d like to see his before/after photos, visit: https://bit.ly/MaxIHS

A Good Samaritan brought Max to the Idaho Humane Society, where our veterinarians bathed him, treated the sores on his skin, bandaged his paws Read more…