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At only three months old, Rajah was found with neither of his back legs able to function. A Good Samaritan found him lying alone, clearly suffering, and rushed him to our Shelter Medical Center. We cleaned and sterilized the large abscess, and sutured it closed to create a tight seal. We then placed a drain into the smaller fistula. Our veterinarians were hopeful that emergency surgery could save both his legs.

During his recovery, he went to a foster home. While there, both of his hind legs regained strength and full function! He was deemed fully healed, but never made it to the adoption floor . . . his foster mom just couldn’t say goodbye to him and he is now a permanent family member.

Congratulations to Rajah and his new home! Watch Video.

Tinkerbell came to us, suffering from an infection. She was slowly leaking pus and needed surgery to correct the issue.

Unfortunately, her infection was deeper than we had hoped and much of her tissue had become necrotic.

Thankfully, she had a successful surgery and has recovered well! She has been adopted into her forever home. Watch video.

Rusty came to us in critical condition needing emergency life-saving surgery. He was initially brought to an emergency veterinary hospital, but after stabilization, recommended that the Idaho Humane Society take over thanks to our incredible surgery team and financial assistance options.

We are unsure how Rusty ended up wounded, but after wandering away from his loving home, he returned home later bleeding from a gunshot wound to the esophagus, his life holding on by a thread.

Our Veterinary Medical Center completed three surgeries over a week to repair his throat. It took many bandage changes and lots of close supervision from our veterinary staff to help him recover. Thankfully, Rusty pulled through, and his owners will now be taking extra precautions to ensure he doesn’t accidentally get out again. Watch Video. 

13-week-old Maggie came into our Veterinary Medical Center after another dog attacked her. The altercation left her with a painful and bulging eyeball—unfortunately, too damaged to be saved. We performed an enucleation surgery to remove the eye so she could live a more comfortable and pain-free life.

She went home the next day to heal up with her family and continue living her life as a happy and healthy puppy. If you need urgent veterinary care, our public veterinary hospital provides several financial programs to help, including grants, low-income discounts, and payment plans.

Leighton was surrendered to the shelter after she had been vomiting for several days and the owners couldn’t afford medical care. Our Shelter Medial Center performed x-rays and found that her intestines were obstructed with a foreign object. We performed an enterotomy surgery to remove a large tube sock that was blocking her intestines.

She recovered remarkably well and was quickly adopted after joining the adoption floor! We are so happy for her and that we were able to provide her a second chance at a happy and healthy life. Learn more.

Morty was brought into us for veterinary care after a Good Samaritan spotted him with a very swollen, red eye. We set right to work and determined the eye was blind and causing him immense pain.

We performed an enucleation surgery to make him more comfortable, where we removed the eye that was causing him pain. We also discovered that Morty had a severe underbite and an abnormal brachycephalic skull shape, where he was affected with a short jaw and nose, similar to a bulldog’s facial structure. Thankfully, this abnormality wasn’t causing him any pain, and he wouldn’t have any chance of passing on this genetic condition since we altered him.

Fortunately, he was easy to fall in love with and was adopted just one day after arriving on our adoption floor. Watch video. 

Bennett, this adorable pup, has had a rough start to his first three months of life. He was found limping by a Good Samaritan, suffering from an injury to his hind leg.

Upon veterinary exam, we discovered that he had a femur fracture, and our Shelter Medical team performed surgery which went very well. We sent Bennett to a foster home for a couple of weeks for some much-needed TLC while he healed.

We’re happy to report that Bennet has been adopted! Watch video. 

Neymar was found as a stray cat by a Good Samaritan, clearly in distress. He was bleeding from his eyes and nose and covered in scars. His teeth were broken and chipped, his ears filled with discharge, and he had missing fur and bloody wounds on his abdomen.

We took an x-ray and discovered that Neymar had been shot and living with a bullet lodged inside his body. What Neymar had fully experienced while living outdoors, we will never know, but once we began treating Neymar, he slowly began warming up to our staff and showing affection.

We sent Neymar to our WISKR program (Women Inmate Social Kitty Retreat) so he would have a safe place to heal and receive socialization. A month later, and Neymar made his way to our adoption floor, where he met and fell in love with his new forever family. Watch Video.

We’d like to introduce you to Drax. He received a total of six surgeries spanning over many months, but now he has perfect elbows, a normal gait, and no pain or obvious forelimb deformity.

Drax was born with severely deformed front legs called “carpal vargus”, an outward turning of the paw from wrist level. Without early aggressive surgical treatment, he would have had a bleak future. Thankfully for Drax, his owners brought him in early for diagnosis. It’s crucial to not ignore lameness, deformity, or gait abnormalities in puppies; the window of opportunity to prevent a lifetime of pain is sometimes very short.

The sum total of these surgeries at a regular veterinary hospital could have easily exceeded $15,000, but we could provide financial assistance because Drax’s owners qualified for one of our life-saving grants. As a result, the total out-of-pocket expenses to Drax’s owners were less than $2,000 for all of the surgeries combined. Watch video. 

Cindy traveled here all the way from Louisiana to receive life-saving and life-changing medical care before finding her new family! She arrived in mid-December needing a hernia repair, mammary masses removed, and biopsied. We then discovered that she needed bilateral MPL (Medial Patella Luxation) surgeries to relieve her knee pain and immobility.

We initially performed surgeries to repair Cindy’s hernia and remove her mammary masses. We sent them off for cancer screening, and Cindy went to foster care for some TLC while she recovered for her upcoming knee surgery. 

In March, Cindy came back for her bilateral knee surgeries and went back to foster care for rehabilitation. Finally, in early April, she was completely recovered and was adopted by her foster mom!  Watch video. 

This gentle giant, Ta’ata, is a six-month-old pup who joined her forever family today!

Prior to coming to IHS, we learned that she had been shot in her right front leg. Upon her physical exam at our Shelter Medical Center, we noted healing wounds and mild swelling, but no overt limping was observed.

X-rays showed a healed fracture of the ulna, as well as metal fragments (suspected bullet particles). Fortunately, no further medical intervention, such as orthopedic surgery, was needed. The fracture healed well and hasn’t created any issues or left her in any pain.

This sweet girl was adopted within 24 hours of joining the adoption floor. We are so happy for her! Watch Video. 

This little fella is Scotty. A Good Samaritan brought him into our shelter after they found him as a stray with a badly injured left front leg.

He was too young for adoption when he first arrived so he spent some time in a foster home, where they tried to treat the wound with guidance from our Shelter Medical Clinic. Unfortunately, the injury was too severe and couldn’t be healed.

We performed an amputation to allow Scotty to live a more comfortable and pain free life. He has now been adopted! Watch Video. 

Meet Naomi! She made the long journey here from Texas in search of finding her new family.

She came into the Texas shelter as a stray suffering from severe trauma to her left front leg. The injury was so bad, there was bone showing—it was irreparable.

Our Shelter Medical Center amputated the leg to give her a pain free and more comfortable life. Naomi is a little over a year old and full of puppy energy; this hasn’t slowed her down one bit. She is now living her best life in her forever home! Watch video. 

Cub is a spunky and loving 4-year-old who came to us from a shelter in Louisiana. Fortunately for Cub, our veterinary hospital was able to help provide corrective surgery to give him a new lease on life. Cub’s orthopedic surgery required a nearly 90-degree turn to align the joins. Thankfully, he rested up and he has made a complete recovery! He has now been adopted into his forever home. Watch video. 

Our mission is not just to save lives, but most importantly, to make sure that every pet we save has its best chance at a high quality of life, free of pain and discomfort. At 120 pounds, Lewis is a big dog who came to us with a big problem. Crippled by ruptured anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in both knees, this gentle giant of a dog was transferred to us from another Idaho shelter that could not afford the more than $10,000 expense required for Lewis’s surgery at a local veterinary practice.

Luckily, the Idaho Humane Society is one of only a handful of shelters in the United States with a hospital that has the equipment and trained staff to routinely provide tibial plateau leveling osteotomy, the state-of-the-art surgery for this condition in dogs. Watch video.

Growler came into the shelter as a stray in late November, 2020. Upon medical exam, our staff was concerned of his excessive drooling, his thin, frail frame, and a lack of self-grooming. We ran his bloodwork, which thankfully did not show signs of organ failure or other abnormalities, but revealed that his several missing teeth indicated severe stomatitis.

Stomatitis is a condition where all the mouth tissue – gums, cheeks, tongue – can become severely inflamed and painful. The root cause is still unknown, but researchers hypothesize this could be an aberrant immune response to the bacteria on the teeth or even to the teeth themselves. Learn more.

Sweet Lenny has a new lease on life after coming to IHS in January from a small rescue in Oregon. Our veterinarians diagnosed him with cherry eye and dry eye, immense ear infections, and painful skin allergies that caused hair loss and made his paws painful to touch. We sent him into foster care for rest and TLC between medical appointments. Fortunately for Lenny, the foster family fell in love and made him a part of their permanent pack. Congratulations to Remi aka Lenny! Learn more.

Our favorite days are when we see the result of months of medical care resulting in a forever home. Oklahoma is one of those special dogs hailing from Louisiana who had been hit by a car and left without veterinary care. 

Upon veterinary exam, our veterinarians discovered several old scars, irregular toenails and confirmed that his hip injury was old. They were unsure if Oklahoma would want to use his leg again but went ahead with surgery to provide a chance to save his leg. Our Shelter Medical Center performed an FHO surgery (femoral head ostectomy) and a dental, removing three teeth and cleaning the others for a healthy new smile. Watch video. 

Lulu came to us in December, morbidly obese weighing 90 pounds, and was suffering from an ear infection. Her ideal weight is closer to 40 pounds, but thanks to our dedicated shelter vet team and her foster parent, they are working hard to provide new chapters in life for this sweet girl.

Originally, Lulu had been overfed by her owner who had dementia. Today, Lulu receives prescription weight loss food and doesn’t get any other snacks. She gets at least one daily walk—which her foster mom said Lulu absolutely loves, but they are mindful to ensure that she doesn’t walk too far or get overheated. Learn more…

Petey had a rough start in life with an accident that injured his eye. He was suffering from an Upper Respiratory Infection as well as a skin rash. After running tests, we discovered that he was FIV+ as well. Once he recovered from his various medical needs, we provided a dental! Learn more…

This handsome 10-month-old pup is Leo! Not too long ago, he found himself in trouble after wandering onto a neighbor’s rural land and was subsequently shot. Our Shelter Medical Center immediately set into work to heal Leo by performing surgery to repair the fracture in his leg.

We sent him to a foster home for TLC for continued healing, and we’re happy to report that he has made a remarkable recovery and is back to his normal pup-like antics. We are thrilled he has been adopted! Learn more…

Precious little Lucy was suffering from infected paws. All four were tender, and she wasn’t bearing any weight on her left hindfoot. But, even though she was in pain, she was the calmest and most loving little kitten.

We provided pain medication and oral antibiotics during her stay with us and treated her paws by washing her feet daily in warm water with diluted antibiotics. Finally, after some serious TLC and close monitoring, our veterinary staff cleared up her infection! She is now in a foster home relaxing while she finishes the last bit of healing. Watch video…

This handsome boy is Loki! He had a short stay at our Veterinary Medical Center after escaping from his owner’s backyard and getting hit by a car.

Unfortunately, Loki was injured and wouldn’t bear any weight on his right hind leg, so they brought him in immediately for veterinary care. Fortunately, we discovered he had only sustained a fracture, and thankfully there were no life-threatening injuries. Learn more…

 

Five days before making his way to our Shelter Medical Center, 6-month-old Goku fell out of a car. Significantly injured, Goku’s owners surrendered him to our shelter due to the cost of private veterinary care and the follow-up home care needed for Goku to make a complete recovery.

Upon examining Goku, our veterinary staff could see he had a fractured radius and ulna on his right forelimb. We performed surgery to stabilize the fracture with a plate and screws, and he went into a loving foster home for healing and recovery. Learn more…

You have to meet Buddy. His story sounds like an old country song. He is 13 years old. We removed one eye that was causing him pain in our Veterinary Medical Center.

We discovered that he had a heart murmur, and removed two large masses to provide comfort. He has a lot of giddy up, calm, super sweet, loving and just wants to be next to you.  Learn more…

Fern was given a second chance at life when a Good Samaritan found her in desperate need of medical care and brought her to our Shelter Medical Center. Her left hind limb had a large abscess wound that was necrotic and swelling as a result. Fern also presented multiple fistulas abnormal (the connection between two body parts) with discharge. Our veterinary team set right to work. 

Fern’s fistulas were a sign that an infection was originating through the skin, and after doing X-rays, we could see the bone was “moth-eaten,” a term used to describe bones littered with small holes. Watch video…

 

Pico was a little grumpy when he arrived at our Veterinary Medical Center, and rightfully so. He had a bulge in his intestines and had a history of chewing on hair ties and rubber bands.

His owner became suspicious when Pico’s mood was off, acting lethargic. He took Pico to an emergency veterinary hospital and took x-rays; they showed that materials were lodged in his intestines.

Pico’s owner brought him to the Idaho Humane Society because he was told that Pico would receive excellent medical care from a highly experienced veterinary surgical team. Urgent surgical cases like Pico are seen every day at our state-of-the-art facility. Learn more…

Sebastion visited our Veterinary Medical Center after suffering from a ruptured abscess in his left ear, secreting bloody discharge.

Our veterinary staff cleaned the area, inspected it, and added stitches to close the rupture site and prevent infection. It wasn’t long before Sebastion returned home for some R&R with his family.

If you notice any lumps or bumps that cause any concern, please seek veterinary care to help to avoid a possible rupture in the future or allow the growth to reach an overwhelming size.

Tawny visited our Veterinary Medical Center to have a large cyst removed from her tail. It started as a small mass that her owners were carefully watching but then rapidly grew to the size of a cantaloupe.
 
WARNING: GRAPHIC VIDEO. We initially removed the cyst to save Tawny’s tail; however, after several checkups, it was clear her tail was unable to heal. Unfortunately, the end of her tail became necrotic due to the damage inflicted by the large size of the cyst. As a result, we provided a 3/4 tail amputation so Tawny could live a comfortable life.
 
Masses can mean many different things and can be confusing to owners to know which course to take. Watch video…

 

Our Veterinary Medical Center has seen a lot—but this was a first. Kilo was having a great day at home, drooling over the meat being cut in front of him when he suddenly decided it was worth taking a bite for a morsel of food. This situation could have ended very badly, but fortunately, the damage was not severe. He cut his upper lip on the electric meat saw in several places, but thankfully, there was no irreparable damage.

Our veterinary staff stitched him up, and he was on his way home to recover in no time. Kilo is quite the lucky pup, and his situation could have been infinitely worse. This is a good reminder to please keep your pets in mind and their possible erratic behavior when using tools that could cause irreversible damage. Learn more…

Nine-year-old Phoebe came to us in July with severe dry eye in both eyes. We prescribed medication over several months, but unfortunately, Phoebe’s case was non-responsive. She remained unable to produce tears and was highly uncomfortable; copious green discharge and redness filled her eyes.

Our Shelter Medical Center performed a parotid duct transposition surgery where vets rerouted a salivary duct from her mouth into her eye, allowing her natural saliva to bathe her eye and keep it comfortable—basically replacing the tears. We did the next eye after the first successful eye surgery, and with enormous success! Phoebe also received a dental and mass removal while in our care. Learn more…

This little lad, Church, came to us as a stray after suffering a severe injury to his hind end. He had been hit by a car—resulting in multiple pelvic fractures. As a result, his back legs were limp, and he could not stand.

He spent two weeks hospitalized in our Shelter Medical Center. His pelvic fractures were steadily healing, but unfortunately, his left hind leg showed no improvement. He would drag his leg and wouldn’t use it for support or balance.

Our veterinarians amputated the nonfunctioning hind leg to allow him to live a more comfortable and pain-free life. Learn more…

 

At first glance, it was apparent that something was very wrong with Yeti’s ears. One of his ears looked like it had been dipped in a thick black wax, and the other was beginning to turn. Our vets in the Shelter Medical Center knew instantly that Yeti’s severely ulcerated and abnormal ears meant cancer; they removed his ear cartilage and submitted it for biopsy.  

Unfortunately, the results came back as squamous cell carcinoma, the most common skin cancer in cats. Yeti was particularly at-risk due to his coloring (less/no pigmentation) and his likely status as an outdoor cat.  Learn more…

2021

Thanks to your support, we accomplished our life-saving work for animals and community members who rely on Idaho Humane Society services.

We look forward to continuing our work to protect animals and promote humane awareness in the New Year. You help make all of this possible!

Your support continues to brighten the year for animals in need of shelter, veterinary care, and a new forever family.

Please donate today and help us help animals in need.

Little Georgie is lucky to be alive. He was found shivering in the rain, clearly injured, and needing medical assistance. Our veterinarians discovered a badly broken jaw and knew that he had a long road ahead of him for a full recovery.

We provided orthopedic surgery so Georgie could live a pain-free life. He was given an esophagostomy tube in his neck for feeding and had to wear a nylon muzzle for a month to stabilize his jaw for healing. 

Thanks to donors like you, Georgie AKA Drifter received medical and foster care for months. Learn more…

 

Eight-year-old Addie was found as a stray. She was suffering from two cherry eyes and had two mammary masses. What’s a cherry eye? It’s simply a prolapsed third eyelid gland and can be quite common. Dogs and cats both have a third eyelid which is pink and sits close to their eyeball; it functions to protect their eyes from irritation and injury, as well as wash away impurities. If it becomes inflamed and prolapsed, it can cause irritation with decreased tear production.

Our Shelter Medical Center repaired both eyes and removed the masses, which were benign. Learn more…

Sweet Pringle was found as a stray and rescued by Humane Officers after sustaining trauma to her rear hind leg. Unfortunately, her leg was very damaged and could not be saved with orthopedic surgery, so we amputated to ensure she could live a pain-free life.

She is very loving and sweet and loves attention! Watch video…

Honeybee, a 5-month-old pup, was found in Burley, Idaho, with two fractures in her right hind leg. Unfortunately, they could not provide advanced medical care requiring orthopedic surgery, so they sent her to us for a second chance at a healthy and happy life.

Once we repaired Honeybee’s fractures, she went to a foster home so her bones could fully heal (and, of course, receive lots of love in the meantime!) We expect Honeybee’s flexibility and strength in her right hind limb to improve over time as she uses it more and is allowed more activity. Learn more…

 

Bones received a second chance at life after a Good Samaritan found him as a stray and brought him into our Shelter Medical Center. He was suffering from two fractures in his left hind leg and needed immediate help.

Bones had two successful surgeries, repairing both fractures. He then joined a foster home for some much-deserved love and attention while he healed.

A month later, he had the green light for adoption. It only took five days and his new forever family scooped him up to bring him home! Learn more…

Mollie came to us from an underserved community in Idaho needing veterinary care. She had sustained a femur fracture and was littered with metal ammunition fragments. Unfortunately, the fracture was old, and her leg was affected by chronic scarring along with sustained damage to her thigh muscles. Due to the improper healing and the amount of ammunition remaining in her leg, we made the decision to amputate so she could live a comfortable life.

This sweet girl recovered well and made her way to the adoption floor where she was adopted just hours later! She has a new lease on life thanks to our wonderful donors. Please keep our homeless pets in mind so that we can share kindness with those most vulnerable not only in the Treasure Valley, but in rural areas across Idaho with limited resources. Together we can give them new chapters in life filled with love and happiness. Watch video…

If you happen to notice some very adorable cocker spaniel/poodle puppies available for adoption, they had quite a journey to arrive! A family purchased mom through Craigslist and had no idea she was pregnant at the time. Surprise! Please remember that pets require a lifetime commitment and will need loving owners for a decade or more. The foster parent will choose the adopter, so please give the foster parent time to review applications.

Each litter of puppies can easily cost a thousand dollars to monitor, vaccinate, feed and spay/neuter; add on an emergency pyometra surgery and more is spent on these vulnerable pets. If you’d like to donate to help us save lives, please do so today! Learn more…

 

Iris came to us from an underserved and under-resourced shelter in California, needing medical treatment to save her life. Unfortunately, they didn’t have the resources to fix her long list of medical issues. She suffered from multiple pelvic fractures, dislocated left hip, degloved tail, and her left hind leg had a fracture. In order to heal, she needed an FHO (femoral head fracture and hip luxation) to live a pain-free life.

Our Shelter Medical Center amputated her tail since it was in horrific shape and causing her pain; it would never properly heal. We then placed her on strict cage rest after surgery to allow her pelvic fractures time to heal independently. Learn more…

A Good Samaritan found this friendly kitty, Russet, in distress in their yard and contacted our Humane Officers. Thankfully he made his way into us, and under examination, our Shelter Medical Center discovered that Russet was suffering from a broken jaw.

We provided surgery, wiring Russet’s jaw to stabilize his fracture and keep his bones in place for four weeks. While in our care, we also provided a dental and routine neuter. He then went to a foster home for nearly a month to allow him to heal and get some extra TLC. Learn more…

Loki has a new lease on life thanks to life-saving surgery from the Idaho Humane Society. Loki was born with a rare malformation of his urinary tract, which caused urine to build up and damage his right kidney. As a result, the ureter — the tube which normally delivers urine from the kidney to the bladder — became stretched to the width of a soda can when it should be the width of a spaghetti noodle.

The pressure caused irreversible damage to his kidney, and he was at risk for life-threatening rupture or infection. Our medical team drained nearly 2 liters of urine from his right kidney during Loki’s surgery to prevent immediate rupture. Afterward, we removed the damaged kidney and ureter to prevent this from happening again. Click to see photos of his kidney and ureter [WARNING: GRAPHIC]. Watch video…

 

Poor Annabelle didn’t know what happened to her and why she was in so much pain. A Good Samaritan found her after she had encountered trauma, likely being hit by a car.

We jumped into action, provided an exam in our Shelter Medical Center, and discovered that she had sustained hip and femur fractures. Unfortunately, the fractures were old and had already started to heal incorrectly on their own, in addition to sustaining severe damage to her thigh muscles. We wanted to do everything we could to give her leg a chance to heal correctly, so we conducted orthopedic surgery and placed a pin and plate on her femur to allow proper healing. Learn more…

 

Petunia was brought into our shelter as a stray. When our Shelter Medical Center conducted her intake exam, they noticed some “freckles” on her iris. Since this can be an indicator of Iris Melanosis, we elected to do an enucleation (eye removal surgery) to remove the eye with pre-cancerous changes.

Although Iris melanosis is benign, it can transform into malignant cancer. In many cases the pigment first appears as a small, flat and benign nevus, or “freckle,” on the iris. Since we didn’t want to risk the possibility of this turning into cancer and wanted to avoid her having to stay in the shelter longer due to close monitoring, the enucleation surgery was the best option for her. Learn more…

Dante had been hit by a car and hadn’t yet celebrated his first birthday. Unfortunately, his owner could not afford care for the substantial injury and he was surrendered to a shelter in Sacramento, California. The shelter too, was facing challenges with a lack of resources, and the only options were euthanasia or transferring Dante to a shelter that could assist. Thankfully, they knew that the Idaho Humane Society (IHS) would be able to help give Dante a second chance in life.

We transferred Dante into our Shelter Medical Center to receive orthopedic surgery and discovered that his elbow was fractured in several places. He would need to undergo multiple surgeries to correct it. Throughout the months of medical care, no matter how much pain he was in, this sweet boy was loving and affectionate with everyone he met. Learn more…

 

Oreo arrived at our shelter as a stray. Unfortunately, she suffered a severe injury after being hit by a car, leaving her in shock with a crushed pelvis. Our Shelter Medical Center immediately went to work stabilizing her and making her as comfortable as possible. Luckily, her owner reclaimed her but eventually was unable to deal with the after-effects of the trauma and surrendered Oreo and her bonded sister for long-term care and eventual adoption.

Upon Oreo’s surrender, our veterinary staff discovered that her sciatic nerve appeared to be damaged, leading to atrophy and disuse of her right hind limb. While the limb is not painful to her, she cannot use it normally, and we elected not to amputate it as it assists with her balance. We performed an FHO (femoral head and neck ostectomy connecting to the pelvis) to alleviate the pain with her left hind leg healing since it was affected by the crushed bones. Learn more…

 

 

Dandelion had suffered a severe injury as a young kitten. He was found as a stray cold and wet, suffering after trauma with a broken femur and a facial wound. We discovered that he was feral and did not enjoy human attention, but thanks to our dedicated staff and a terrific foster home, the love and attention received won him over.

Unfortunately, he wasn’t quite ready for adoption yet after his femur repair. His tail had become necrotic, and continued to bother him during his recovery period. We kept a watchful eye on it to see if we could begin healing it, but ultimately it was beyond repair. We provided a tail amputation to prevent future pain and suffering. Learn more…

Roman had been badly injured in his pelvic region; he had trouble standing and urinating due to the trauma and was in desperate need of medical attention. Unfortunately, the Northern California shelter didn’t have the resources to treat him, so they asked us to transfer him into our shelter to provide medical care.

Roman arrived, and we immediately set to work at our Shelter Medical Center to provide a new chapter in his life! We discovered a craniodorsal hip luxation on the right and ilial, ischial, and pubic fractures on the left side. We successfully performed a Femoral Head Ostectomy (FHO) procedure and worked with medication and care to correct his bladder and urinary issues. Learn more…

 

Wrex came to us from MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter after suffering from a spiral femur fracture. This eight-month-old Border Collie mix was so sweet even though he was in pain. Our Shelter Medical Center provided orthopedic surgery and he recovered amazingly well!

After he was stable for travel post-surgical care, he was transported back to McPaws in McCall, Idaho where they welcomed him into his foster home. Thankfully for Wrex, he won their hearts as he recovered from his surgery, and he was adopted Wednesday! The foster family renamed him Bandit — we are thrilled for them all! Watch video…

 

 

This little lady was found as a stray in March of 2021, and brought safely into us by a Humane Officer. Once our veterinary staff completed her intake exam, it was apparent she would have a lengthy stay with us after discovering numerous medical issues.

Flora has a condition known as Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), commonly referred to as dry eye. We were able to get her on medication to help her natural tear production and she has improved tremendously.

While getting her eyes healed up, we removed a mammary mass and performed a hernia repair. Learn more…

Lady has a new lease on life! Since last year, we have been working with residents on the Duck Valley Reservation to help reduce pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, as well as performing medical care for pets in need. Lady’s owner alerted us that she was limping on her right hind leg.

Our Shelter Medical Center examined her and discovered a fractured right femur. Thanks to donors like you, we performed orthopedic surgery and returned Lady back home to her owner for free! Learn more…

Good Samaritans found Bobby in dire need of medical attention. They discovered that he had been shot and had sustained a significant injury on his hind leg near Jerome, Idaho. Our friends at Anythings Pawsable Foundation Inc asked if we could provide medical care after they were able to catch Bobby and his brother.

Upon Bobby’s arrival, we provided a veterinary exam and discovered that the injury was too severe to save his leg and amputation was required so that Bobby could live a pain-free life. After his surgery, he was sent to foster care TLC and recovery. Learn more…

 

DJ came to us in early July, and we have been working on getting her healthy and ready for adoption ever since. On the surface, it was easy to see she needed medical care because of her large visible masses. However, it wasn’t until we conducted routine bloodwork that we discovered her internal medical concerns.

We routinely perform medical work on older pets before surgery, and as DJ was 7-years-old, she met the age requirement. Unfortunately, the initial tests showed an elevated liver enzyme, so we performed additional diagnostic tests, x-rays, and an abdominal ultrasound to rule out any concerns. Thankfully, we found that DJ’s liver is functioning well, and there are no other signs of systemic disease. Learn more…

“At first, we didn’t even know what color she was,” remarked Andrea, our Humane Officer called on the scene where six-month-old Val was wholly saturated in oil. Somehow, Val had fallen into an abandoned oil drum on the farm where she was living as a young stray. Remarkably, this little fighter managed to get herself out of the drum all on her own. When the property owner spotted her, he called us immediately, worried she was going to die.

Val was rushed back to the Shelter Medical Center for veterinary care, where our staff leaped into action to save young Val’s life. They triaged her with a warm bath to remove the oil, which revealed her true colors… she was black and white! Learn more…

Luca is a terrific one-year-old German Shepherd dog that came to us with a broken femur bone after being hit by a car. He was one of our recent transfers from a Sacramento shelter to us, due to not having the resources to help Luca with surgery to recovery. 

We provided orthopedic surgery at our Shelter Medical Center and he is now looking for a foster parent. Learn more…

Meet Lady. This 16-year-old came to us needing medical care after her owner became sick and was unable to care for her. We provided an eye enucleation at our Shelter Medical Center and removed two mammary masses.

Thankfully, the results came back benign, and we were able to adopt her out into a new loving home.

 

Kahlua is an adorable hound mix who recently underwent orthopedic surgery for a femur fracture at our Shelter Medical Center. She is 6-months-old and looking for a foster parent who can assist with spending company as a couch potato or resting in a kennel or small room so she doesn’t use her leg too much.

The best part about becoming a foster parent is that you can adopt if you fall in love! You can also choose the adopter through an application process on our website, or return her to our adoption floor in about 3 weeks. Learn more…

Clover came to IHS severely underweight, depressed, and listless. She was emaciated and sick for several months, vomiting frequently after meals. Our veterinarians examined her and performed diagnostic tests to determine the cause of her illness. Her bloodwork suggested liver disease, but x-rays were taken, and several very large objects were discovered in her intestinal tract which had caused an intestinal blockage.

We performed intestinal surgery to remove the foreign bodies which were difficult to identify due to how long they had been in her body. They likely were the remnants of some type of rubber toy. A liver biopsy was taken and after surgery Learn more…

Sitka was found abandoned in the desert and brought into our shelter for medical care. She was born with an abnormally shaped arm that was catching on items around her and causing her pain. 

We performed surgery and amputated the affected part of her leg that was holding her back in life so she could leave a pain-free and active life! Thanks to our amazing donors, we were able to transfer her back to a smthe small rescue that found her for recovery and adoption!

 

Four-month-old Larry has a new lease on life thanks to a Good Samaritan who found him in need of aid after a traumatic event. West Vet transferred him to our Shelter Medical Center for care. Upon exam, we discovered that he had a degloved chin, where his skin was separated from muscle, exposing the bone and roots of his teeth. Larry’s left front leg had also sustained an irreparable and painful injury, causing him to walk on his elbow for mobility.

We performed surgery to reattach the skin and soft tissues to repair his chin, and amputated the leg that was causing him pain. Unfortunately, we couldn’t repair his leg due to the severity of his injury, and by removing the limb, he could live a more comfortable and pain-free life. Learn more…

She had a faint odor of smoke, singed fur, burned paw pads and ears. Plastic was melted to her thick, matted fur. Her whiskers were also singed, and she wasn’t bearing any weight on her back left leg. All four of her feet had clay litter stuck to them, and her hind feet were inflicted with acute moist dermatitis (hot spots of skin inflammation and bacterial infection).

When Crème was found by a Good Samaritan, they knew she needed our help and rushed her to us. We are unsure what trauma this sweet girl went through, but we are thankful that we could give her a second chance. Learn more…

Tank is just that, a TANK! This friendly boy came to us in early July as a transfer from Burley. When we first examined him, he had wounds open across his back, we believe from a spider bite. We immediately set into action treating him by providing systemic/oral medications and bandage changes. Each bandage change costs approximately $55 and sedation costs $50; we changed bandages under sedation 11 times. That’s nearly $1200 spent on bandage changing alone to provide medical care. Tank has healed very well and there are now only small, superficial wounds remaining that do not need any medications or bandages to finish healing.

This boy is friendly with everyone and everything he has met while here in the shelter! He is reported to do well with cats and dogs in the home (with a proper introduction) and is housetrained. The skin along Tank’s back may be more sensitive to the sun and/or more fragile to abrasions, Learn more…

 

Thor* is a busy puppy who fell off a short ledge during playtime. His owners kept a watchful eye on him and noticed he wasn’t bearing any weight on his front right leg, so they took him to a veterinary hospital for an exam. Unfortunately, the doctor suspected a possible fracture and referred Thor’s family to our Veterinary Medical Center for surgery.

When dogs are young, falls do not have to be extremely high to inflict damage; in fact, even a foot or so can cause sudden injury to their soft bones.

Our veterinary team performed a consultation and discovered that Thor had a right humerus lateral condyle (elbow) fracture. We performed surgery to realign the broken bones and stabilized the fragments using stainless steel implants. Learn more…

Jack was struggling to urinate. He would often lift his legs on walks and his owner noted that he produced no urine. Jack’s owner knew that his 9-year-old lab needed immediate medical care. He took Jack to an emergency vet where Jack’s urethra was flushed so he could urinate, but surgery was needed to remove the bladder stones.

Jackie’s owner brought him to the Idaho Humane Society because he was told that Jack would receive excellent medical care from a highly experienced veterinary surgical team. Urgent surgical cases like Jack are seen every day at our state-of-the-art facility. We’re happy to report that the surgery was successful, and Jack is now home recovering. Learn more…

The first six weeks of life have sure been tough on little Frederick. Not only was he found and brought in as a stray, but he was also suffering from trauma on his left hind leg.

Frederick would drag his leg behind him as he walked, and his foot was black due to the tissue dying. Our Shelter Medical Staff determined he had a chronic femur fracture, extreme hypertension at his hock, firm swelling at his left femur, and he was unable to flex his hock with severe gastric contracture (limited movement in the ankle joint.)

We are unsure what caused this injury, other than the small hole shown above his leg in the video. Learn more…

 

Rose (name changed) paid a visit to our Veterinary Medical Center last week to lose some weight; more specifically, the massive tumor on her stomach. It had grown so large that it started to get sores due to skin stretching and dragging.

Often, people think tumors will go away and clear up on their own; however that is rare. Unfortunately, the tumor will generally reach an extreme size, causing a nuisance for the pet and more extensive surgery to remove. Other times, people wait because of financial reasons.

We strongly urge people to take their pets to the vet sooner rather than later if they notice a growth. In addition, we offer several options Learn more…

Sophie (name changed) is an 8-week old ball of cuteness that arrived at our Veterinary Medical Center with a badly injured eye. Our vet staff performed a thorough exam and determined the eye had been damaged beyond repair and was causing her pain.

We did an enucleation surgery to remove her eye in order to allow her to live a more comfortable and pain-free life.

Due to her small stature, being put under for surgery could be very hard on her tiny body; however, she is a fighter and pulled through just fine. Now she is back with her family and recovering at home! Learn more…

(WARNING: graphic images!)  Disbelief. That’s one word to describe what our Veterinary Medical Center felt when 11-year-old Ace arrived at our veterinary hospital; he had a large stick protruding from the right side of his stomach. The family transferred him from an emergency hospital to our clinic because we had payment plan options, instead of having to come up with all the funds all at once.

Our veterinary staff performed an exam to set up the strategy for Ace’s surgery. Miraculously, the stick protruded at an angle, missing all his organs. Learn more…

 

Dracula came into our Shelter Medical Center with a broken fibula and tibia. We provided care and casting for this sweet cat and monitored for healing. Dracula was cleared for adoption (yes that was the name he came in with!) and waiting to get moved to our adoption floor, when a kitten was brought in, on the brink of dying. She was covered in fleas, anemic, and in desperate need of medical intervention.

Dracula provided blood for a blood transfusion with the hopes that it would be enough to give her a fighting chance. After recovering from donating blood, he was adopted within hours! Congratulations to Dracula and his new loving family. Learn more…

 

Pebbles’ lethargy didn’t go unnoticed at our shelter. Upon further exam, we discovered a swollen and tender abdomen and jumped into action, suspecting she needed emergency care. Our Shelter Medical Center performed an ultrasound, allowing them to confirm she had a pyometra, where her uterus was large, infected, and filled with pus.

A healthy uterus in a female dog is the shape of a “V” and is typically a finger’s width along each side. As you can see in the picture, Pebbles’ was monumentally bigger than Dr. McCrath’s hand, let alone just a single finger. Learn more…

What was supposed to be a routine neuter for 11-month-old Jasper turned into a need for emergency heart surgery.

Our Washington State University vet students performed an exam under the supervision of Dr. Castillo; they noticed a very loud and continuous heart murmur, leading them to believe he had a congenital heart condition called “patent ductus arteriosus” or PDA. To explain, as Jasper developed in utero, the PDA blood vessel worked to move blood past the lungs and back to the rest of the body. At the time of birth and upon his first breath, the PDA is supposed to close, allowing blood to flow into the lungs. With a PDA, the ductus arteriosus stays open and diverts blood away from the lungs. Read more…

 

Antoinette raised kittens in foster, then came in for her routine spay when our veterinary staff made a shocking discovery; her sternum was abnormal with a bony point. We immediately took x-rays, and it revealed that not only had her sternum been broken at some point, but she had a ruptured diaphragm, meaning most of her liver and some intestines were in her chest near her heart.

This type of injury is usually due to blunt force trauma to the chest or abdomen, such as being hit by a car, falling from a tree, getting kicked, etc. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery to replace the abdominal organs into the abdomen and sewed her diaphragm back up. Learn more…

 

Rosco has been through a lot in his short 11 months of life, and he’s been with us for almost half of it. He arrived as a transfer from another shelter in dire need of medical intervention to correct the positioning of his front legs. We diagnosed Rosco with having front leg deformities; his ulna stopped growing prematurely in both of his forelegs, which resulted in a sizeable abnormal bow in his legs.

Being a young pup full of energy and no manners, Rosco needed to work on his jumping habits and mouthiness before surgery to aid during recovery. A foster home welcomed him with open arms and provided love and training to prevent any further injury. Learn more…

Billy came to us with an open and worrisome-looking wound above his tail. He lives as an indoor and outdoor kitty, and after one of his trips outside, he returned home wounded. His owners brought him in for fear that he was infected with maggots.

After close monitoring by our Veterinary Medical Shelter and no sight of maggots, we cleaned the wound so it could heal properly and returned him to his family.

Not every case like this has a happy ending. Cats that are allowed to venture outdoors have shorter life expectancies and a substantially higher risk of injury. Read more…

 

Sid (Garth) came to us after suffering horrific abuse; his body was littered with ammunition, including a .22 shell, three pellets, and a large swath of shotgun blast. His left eye was damaged due to the shotgun pellets, leaving him with irreparable damage and in a severe amount of pain. His left ear was also severely hit, leaving shot wounds in his ear, but thankfully, it could be cleaned and wrapped for recovery.

Our Shelter Medical Center provided an enucleation surgery to remove Sid’s injured eye, allowing him to be more comfortable and live a pain-free life. Sid now has a new lease on life; we will be transferring him back to Friends Furever Animal Rescue for adoption. Learn more…

 

Dreyfus came into our shelter as a stray on June 7th. She had an upper respiratory infection which is not uncommon to see in felines, as well as conjunctivitis (an eye inflammation). We prescribed antibiotics and provided TLC during her recovery process.

If you’d like to help kittens through their kitty colds and prepare them for adoption, we are still in need of foster parents! Learn more or sign up today.

It was a terrible discovery. The veterinarian immediately knew that this was no accident; these injures were deliberate and forceful. Worse, there were old and new injuries, meaning poor Luna* had been suffering from long-time abuse.

Luna had FOURTEEN fractured ribs, blunt force trauma to the eye and liver, three fractured teeth, three fractures on her left hind foot, it was horrific, disturbing abuse. Learn more…

Introducing Moe Jo! She was transferred to us from another shelter because she had an injured leg. Her back left leg was stiff and didn’t bend at the knee, due to a prior break in the leg. It was an irreparable and painful injury causing her discomfort. Our Shelter Medical Staff performed an amputation to allow her to live more comfortably and without pain.

She is a very smart girl! Her loves are playing fetch and going for walks. She doesn’t let her new 3-legged life hold her back! Moe Jo also enjoys toys and affection. Learn more…

 

This is Zeke, a 10-year-old super sweet and shy boy that loves to be pet. He came to IHS as a stray, so we do not have information on how he is with other animals or children.

When he arrived, he had a wound on his right hip. Our Veterinary Medical Staff cared for it and have him on antibiotics while it finishes healing. Learn more…

WARNING: GRAPHIC VIDEO. Gordo was in desperate need of medical care. He came to our shelter with a severely infected, profound wound in his left armpit. We flushed and bandaged the wound daily for weeks, then at subsequent intervals for several months.

His wound is nearly healed. There is still a small area of pink, fresh scarring, which should mature to a firm white scar over time. Due to the shape of this area and its scarring, some skin and oil may get trapped in this area. He would benefit from regular bathing or spot cleaning Learn more…

Meet Captain; he is a shelter favorite for his playfulness and loving nature—despite his rough life. Our Shelter Medical Staff knew he needed immediate medical intervention: he came to us as a transfer and had recently been through a traumatic experience. His right front foot was missing, his face was swollen, he was covered in scabs and scars, and he had several ticks embedded that we removed.

Captain’s face was swollen, stemming from dental issues. We discovered that most of his teeth were missing and extracted a few more cracked and painful teeth while providing a dental cleaning. Learn more…

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. A Good Samaritan discovered this cat greatly suffering because his leg was crushed in a steel-jaw leg hold trap off Five Mile between Overland and Victory. Every year we rescue pets that have been injured by traps, and we consider this type of incident to be among the most cruel abuses of animals in our city.

Traps MUST have identifying marks on them to be considered legal by Idaho Fish and Game; these traps held no such marks. While the updated Boise City Ordinance recently improved, pets and wildlife in our community could be protected from cruel treatment by adding a ban Learn more…

Meet Paddy! He is a friendly and handsome boy who received some extra love from our Director of Shelter Medicine, Dr. Alix McGrath.

He arrived as a stray with a serious injury to his front leg, causing him a lot of pain and discomfort. Unfortunately, the wound was too severe and his leg was amputated to live a pain-free life.

Paddy is also FIV+ which means he needs to be an indoor-only cat. Learn more…

“Can you tell me the story of how you rescued me again?” If our shelter animals could talk, they’d tell a tale of how they received life-saving medical care for a second chance at a life at our shelter.

At barely over a year old, Mabel has endured more pain and obstacles than any pet should in a lifetime; she had been hit by a car and suffered severe injuries to her pelvis and hind end. We provided urgent surgery to repair her pelvic fractures, but unfortunately, the injury to her right hip socket was so severe it was not salvageable. In order to make her more comfortable and functional, her leg was amputated.

Thankfully, she adjusted to tripod life fairly effortlessly since she hadn’t been bearing any weight on her damaged leg. Learn more…

We are so thankful that we are able to coordinate with other shelters in Idaho and beyond to work together to find forever homes for our animal friends. Last year, we transferred 1,015 animals into our shelter! We could not have achieved this without the countless hours spent by staff and volunteers to make this happen.

Cowgirl is one of our recent transfer cases. She came to us unable to stand because of fractures on both her hind legs. Our Veterinary Medical Staff immediately performed a full examination, studied her x-rays, and determined she needed a double orthopedic surgery. Learn more…

Last year, we provided more than 1.5 million dollars worth of free or discounted veterinary medical care to low-income families and shelter pets. There’s nothing more heartwarming than reuniting a family pet with its grateful owners after life-saving surgery, many of whom had nowhere else to turn other than the Idaho Humane Society. One of our wonderful clients wrote us recently:

“Okie has been in my life for over six years. He is my unofficial therapy dog. He helped me cope with an abusive ex-husband… and got me through depression and anxiety and the fallout from dealing with it all. He has a unique personality, almost catlike. He enjoys lying on the back of the couch, climbing trees, barking at dogs on TV, and getting on my kitchen counter. He is a small dog with a big presence. I can’t imagine life without him. Learn more…

This handsome boy is Brax. He was transferred to us because unfortunately, his eyes were infected with a lot of discharge. After a thorough exam by our Shelter Medical team, they discovered he was already blind after long-term exposure and in an immense amount of pain. We performed an enucleation surgery to remove both eyes, allowing him to live a pain-free life.

Now, Brax is a loving fellow with a playful side. This guy does not let his blindness hold him back, his zest for life is contagious! He is often playing and keeping himself busy with toys. Brax has a purr that can be heard miles away and loves attention. While he can get a little overstimulated, Brax will make a great addition to a family with slightly older, cat savvy kids. Learn more…

Corndog found her new family after nearly a two-month stay with us; she received medical care after being transferred to us with a dislocated ankle. Our Shelter Medical Center staff reduced the dislocation and placed the joint in a splint for several weeks. After the joint became stabilized, Corndog went to a foster home for recovery.

Several weeks later, Corndog returned for a recheck and received an exam and x-rays to determine if she would need surgery or if the splint provided healing and correction. Corndog impressed the staff with her remarkable recovery; she didn’t need surgery! Learn more…

Needing medical intervention to live a pain-free and full functioning life, this cute pup was brought into our Shelter Medical Center from the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. Dottie, an 8-month-old border collie, was suffering and in severe pain from a right hind leg femur fracture. While in our care, we were able to repair the fracture and spay her.

After a couple of weeks of monitoring by our veterinary staff, Dottie was transferred back to her home where she will spend the next 6-14 weeks recovering. Each animal’s healing process can range quite a bit, but until their bone is fully healed, their mobility is extremely limited. Learn more…

Toph’s eyes were in bad shape when she arrived as a stray. They were sunken in, red, swollen, very cloudy, and full of green discharge. She didn’t want to be handled and was hissing and swatting, but our staff didn’t give up on her.

Her corneas didn’t look normal, and when combined with pain and other symptoms, our Shelter Medical Center performed an enucleation surgery, removing both blind and painful eyes.

It turns out she wasn’t a mean stray at all; she was just in horrible pain and didn’t want to be handled. She is very social and sweet and loves attention! Learn more…

With multiple bone breaks and in dire need of immediate medical intervention, Inky (formerly Bumble) was transferred to our Shelter Medical Center. He had several fractures on his right femur and his left ankle. Several toes were degloved (where the skin is removed from the muscle) down to the bone–it was barely hanging on by a small dried piece of tissue. Poor thing!

We performed emergency surgery to help ease Inky’s pain and correct the injuries. A greater trochanter repair was conducted on the right femur, a femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHO) on the right hip, and cross pinning of the fracture on the left ankle. We are so happy to report that he recovered excellently and now is enjoying life with his new family! Learn more…

Marvin the Martian experienced several urinary blockages before being transferred to our Veterinary Medical Shelter. Once in our care, we determined he needed a Perineal Urethrostomy surgery. This procedure is a surgical reconstruction of the genitalia to create a wider urinary opening. Urinary blockages are common in male cats; however, it is not common for cats to have to go to the extent of a Perineal Urethorsotomy surgery.

If you have a male cat, look for the following signs of a blockage: straining to urinate, bloody urine, urinating in unusual places, and howling in pain when trying to urinate. Learn more…

For nearly a year, we have been driving to Duck Valley Indian Reservation every two weeks to spay/neuter approximately 40 animals, either personally owned pets or animals that are being rehomed at our Adoption Center.

Last week, we set cat traps and caught this kitten clinging to life after suffering from what appears to be an animal attack. If you’d like to see her intake pictures WARNING GRAPHIC: visit http://bit.ly/IHS-Halo

After arriving safely back at our shelter, she underwent life-saving surgery. Unfortunately, she contracted severe pneumonia, which is not uncommon, given the significant obstacles she has faced thus far in life. Learn more…

Harvey (formerly Phantom) was transferred to us from a Treasure Valley shelter with a fractured femur. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery to place a metal plate and screws into his bone to heal his broken bone. A loving foster home took him in to aid in his recovery process for rest and healing. This surgery requires several months after the bone heals to remodel and strengthen over time. We’re happy to report that this striking boy has been adopted out of foster care and is now living with his new family!

Congrats Harvey and family; we are so happy for you all! Learn more…

This cute boy, Willy, was transferred after the previous shelter noticed a large swelling on his neck. When he arrived, our Shelter Medical staff aspirated the swelling and found saliva. This meant that his salivary gland or duct had ruptured and was leaking saliva into his tissues. We removed the damaged salivary glands on that side and he is doing well. This injury is usually due to trauma to the neck or face and it seems like this guy has been through the ringer; we also removed an eye as it looked like it had been ruptured previously and we took out a severely abscessed tooth.

We are so happy to report he is feeling much better now and adjusting to his new outlook Read more…

This striking boy is Harry (formerly known as Oliver) and he arrived as a stray in rough condition. He had a dislocated hip and a diaphragmatic hernia, meaning he was probably hit by a car. His hernia had ruptured and his stomach, liver and intestines were in his chest taking up the space that his lungs should be in. Our Shelter Medical staff performed emergency lifesaving surgery to repair the hernia and did an FHO (femoral head ostectomy) surgery on his left hind leg. He recovered beautifully and is now living life in his new forever home.

His new owner said, “He is such a lover and constantly wants to be pet and gives loving head-butts to tell you he wants attention! Read more…

The Idaho Youth Ranch Hays House welcomed a sweet, cuddly blonde to their staff… meet Maeve!

Maeve came to IHS after her original owner could no longer care for her due to cancer, and she wanted to give Maeve a new chapter filled with love. We were hopeful that the kids at the Hays House would welcome her in with open arms; after all, she’s an expert at giving hugs and kisses and easing stress and worries away. They were beyond thrilled to meet her, and even better, she and Bear (her new dog-brother and IHS Alum) are getting along like peaches and cream! Learn more…

When our humane officers first saw them, they were almost unrecognizable as dogs. Fearful, they attempted to elude capture, running towards traffic. The only good thing about the extremely tangled and filthy matted fur that encased their bodies was that it slowed them down enough so that our officers could rescue them from the streets.    A failure to provide basic grooming can result in a torture-like condition for neglected pets. Twisted mats of fur cause skin infections, harbor parasites, cause abrasions and lacerations, and can even form tourniquets around limbs that then require amputation. Severe matting can even be life-threatening. We rescue pets in this miserable condition every year. Watch video…

Lea, like many of our feline friends, loves to snack on hairbands. Unfortunately, hairbands are not easily passable and frequently get stuck in the intestine, which is quite painful. Our Veterinary Medical Shelter performed an urgent enteronomy to locate the obstruction and remove the hairbands… a lot of them!

We’ve seen several cats over the last month in our veterinary clinic for this exact reason; however, hairbands aren’t the only household items cats tend to eat. It’s essential to pay attention to your pet’s habits: notice what items they are drawn to or chew on, and try to keep them tucked away safely out of their reach. Learn more…

Badly injured with severe wounds on his face, Theo needed immediate medical attention. This poor stray cat had likely been bitten, and his face became swollen due to the trauma he endured. Thankfully our amazing Shelter Medical team was able to clean and provide care, which he responded to wonderfully. The trauma brought on congestion, but our vets are hopeful that it will subside in the next two weeks. There is, however, a small chance of some chronic congestion or inflammation in the sinuses or nasal passages due to permanent damage.

Theo is also FIV+, which means he must be an indoor-only cat and unfortunately cannot go to a home with other cats that do not have FIV. Watch video…

Billy was transferred to us from an underserved community without the resources to treat his medical condition. They knew Billy needed surgery as he hopped like a rabbit with his hind legs jumping up and down. Thanks to your support, we are a resource for overcrowded and underfunded shelters to step in and provide needed surgical care to prevent unnecessary euthanasia.

We performed a surgery called Femoral Head and Neck Ostctomy (FHO) surgery to repair the femoral head and neck at the hip joint. This surgery provides relief because the bones no longer grind together. You wouldn’t know how much pain Billy was in because he such a sweet boy—always snuggled by your side for love and affection. Learn more…

Panda came to us with a rectal prolapse, where part of her colon fell out of her anus. The issue didn’t correct itself, so Panda came to us for medical care. Our Shelter Medical Center tried to reduce the prolapse several times, but unfortunately, the issue remained.

We performed a colopexy surgery to ensure that Panda would have a new life without this issue. We sutured the colon to the abdominal body wall to keep it in place and make prolapse impossible. We are so happy Panda is all healed up and gets to enjoy life in her new forever home! Learn more…

Baily was surrendered to us in October of 2020 for health reasons. Her walk was very bowlegged and eerily similar to that of a crab. Our veterinarians performed an exam and discovered she needed two MPLS (bilateral medial luxating patellas,) which means ‘out of place’ or ‘dislocated,’ as well as a TPLO. In Baily’s case, her kneecaps were moving out of their normal location. Our Shelter Medical Center performed surgery and sent her to foster care for recovery and TLC.

It’s been three months and we’re delighted to announce Baily is medically released and ready to be adopted! Now she can run and explore without any hindrance from her legs Learn more…

Roly Poly Oly quickly became a shelter favorite after making his way to us as a transfer from California. He had been hit by a car and was believed to have had a fractured shoulder, but Dr. McGrath discovered he had two fractured shoulders and a broken pelvic bone.

He was just six-months-old when Dr. McGrath performed a bilateral humeral fracture repair on his right and left shoulder. Unfortunately, as Roly started on his road to recovery, he got pneumonia; however, it was caught quickly and treated. Roly couldn’t walk for two weeks, so our hospital staff used a harness to hold up his legs, which allowed him to walk outside to go potty and receive enrichment from the great outdoors. This little boy was so loved, they held water in their hands for him to drink, doted constantly on him with love Learn more…

This sweet girl, Tiny, came to us after her owner noticed she had a hard stomach and wasn’t eating. Tiny was also lethargic, shivering and was whining frequently. After a thorough exam, our Veterinary Medical Shelter diagnosed her as having an infected uterus, known as a pyometra, which is a life-threatening uterine infection that affects older, un-spayed female dogs. We performed emergency surgery and are happy to report that Tiny is doing great.

If a pyometra isn’t treated immediately, your beloved pet could pass away suddenly. To officially diagnose, a veterinarian will run complete blood work, urinalysis, conduct a radiograph, and an ultrasound. We see a great number of dogs needing life-saving surgery with pyometras each week, leaving the owner in unexpected financial and emotional distress. Read more…

This little ball of wiggles, Mariposa, came to us last September after a young child accidentally stepped on her. These kinds of accidents are quite common, especially when dogs are small and fragile at a young age. Weighing just three pounds, she underwent a fracture repair surgery… imagine her little bone being repaired that was just about the size of a toothpick! She was a trooper through the whole procedure and was on her way to recovery.

This week Mariposa paid us another visit for preventative health, as all animals receiving care at our Veterinary Medical Center must agree to get spayed/neutered. Today, she is 8 months old and weighed in at a whopping 4 pounds! Learn more…

Coco Bean came to us with fishing line wrapped tightly around his leg. Our veterinarians determined that surgery was needed to safely remove the line and ensure that no hooks were embedded. We kept a watchful eye and closely monitored his leg and toes to see if there would be any tissue damage. Coco Bean recovered well with the use of his leg and thankfully, there was no permanent damage. He’s back to being a happy and sweet kitten who loves attention!

This is a great reminder to those who fish or use fishing line for crafts or other projects. Please keep the line out of your pet’s reach and safely dispose of any old or unused line; it is hazardous and potentially fatal to pets and wildlife if left unattended. Learn more…

At just four years old, Marnie has sure been through a lot in her short lifetime. She originally came to us after the death of her owner in October, 2019. She was terrified of the shelter environment and would hide under her blanket to avoid having anyone see her. We immediately began working with her to find a foster home so that she could relax from this high-stress situation to decompress and prepare for her upcoming TPLO (Tibial Plateau Levelling Osteotomy) and double bilateral MPL surgery to repair her back knees.

The surgery was a success, and we sent Marnie back to foster care for recovery. She was nearly done with her journey and enjoying her new knees outdoors…when  suddenly Watch video…

Many of you have heard of Parvo and how deadly it can be with dogs. Panleukopenia (panleuk) is the cat version of Parvo; it’s just as deadly if untreated or unvaccinated and can live for a long time on surfaces.

Panleuk used to be the leading cause of death in cats; many shelters don’t have space or resources to treat felines infected with Panleuk. Unfortunately, these felines are usually humanely euthanized on intake because of how contagious this virus is.

The Idaho Humane Society is proud to treat Parvo/Panleuk at our intake facility Learn more…

Sabrina came to us after her owner noticed she began urinating outside of her little box and around the house. When her owner discovered blood in her urine, she was taken to West Vet where she was given an ultrasound and was diagnosed with bladder stones.

Looking for more affordable care, her owner brought her to our Veterinary Medical Shelter where we provided surgery to remove the stones. Bladder stones are quite painful for pets; here are some signs to watch out for:

• frequent urination, especially in odd places
• blood in the urine
• painful urination

If bladder stones are left untreated, they can become fatal. Read more…

Miss Harley came to us with cheat grass embedded in her ear. After our Veterinary Medical Staff removed the cheat grass, they put her in a “no-flap-ear-wrap” to allow the ear to heal without her scratching it or the ear being shaken too much.

Cheat grass can cause a tremendous amount of issues and pain. It can become stuck anywhere from the ear, to getting wedged between toes, in paws, the hair, mouth, and even the nose! It’s important to thoroughly check your dog after outdoor adventures (and cats if they go outside your home!). Brushing is a great way to remove any that might be on their coat, but closely examine the common problem areas listed above. Read more…

A New Year’s Eve surgery brought Willy new wrist joints that would allow him to walk independently. After jumping from a balcony a few weeks back, he suffered severe hypertension to both of his front wrist joints and couldn’t walk on his own unless he was wearing splints. When these supporting ligaments are torn, they hardly ever heal, and if they do heal through scar tissue, they lack the strength to adequately stabilize the joints, resulting in chronic pain and severe disability.

Thankfully, Willy was able to receive a joint fusion surgery at our Veterinary Medical Center. This solution gave Willy the chance to walk on his own without pain or splints, providing a new chapter filled with fun, exercise, and bonding with his owner. Read more… or watch update video.

This handsome boy, Oso, came to us after contracting parvo at 6 months old. We’re happy to announce that Oso survived Parvo and has found his forever home!

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease that is most likely to affect young puppies and unvaccinated dogs. It’s very important to take precautions to prevent the disease and to respond immediately if your dog starts to show any symptoms.

Here is what you should know:
– Young puppies are at the highest risk of parvo. Read more…

If your pup likes munching on sticks and branches, don’t miss out on this story!

Just last week, a sweet pup came to our Veterinary Medical Center after its owner noticed it wasn’t eating much and was continually smacking its lips and licking around his mouth. Upon examination, our veterinary staff discovered a stick lodged between his teeth on the roof of his mouth near his throat. We removed the stick and this pup is back to his happy self!

Dogs love chasing and chewing on sticks, but it’s always a good idea to check them after being outdoors. This will help to ensure nothing is stuck in their mouth, paws, or ears, and that there’s no lacerations from chewing on random objects. If you do happen to notice something, the quicker a vet can see your pet, the better! Learn more…

Bailey is lucky to be alive. This sweet 8-month-old pup was enjoying a car ride with his owner. Suddenly, while leaning against the backseat window, his paw hit the automatic button and the window rolled down! Unfortunately, he lost his balance and fell out of the window while the car was moving.

His owner needed help urgently and brought him to our Veterinary Medical Center. Our staff discovered that part of his right front leg was hanging in an unnatural position, and he wouldn’t put any weight on it. Veterinarians determined that his leg had no chance of healing with surgery, so unfortunately, amputation was the best course of action. Read more…